Smart Fortwo EQ Cabrio Tested By Autogefühl Video

Autogefühl definitely prefers the cabrio EQ over the coupe and considers convertible and electric a fantastic match.smart fortwo EQ spec:In the latter part of the video there are other sustainability topics covered like electric boats:53:56 Go Boat electric leisure boats in Copenhagen Interview: Kasper Eich-Romme, co-founder57:00 HH Ferries going electric between Helsingor and Helsingborg Interview: Jorgen Damgaard, Senior Master1:03:07 Sustainable public interiors @ Green Furniture Concept Interview: Johan Berhin, founder & designer1:07:47 Orestad, Copenhagen, new city quarter Interview: Bo Christiansen, Architect Is Daimler Considering Smart EV Production In China? Daimler Preps Smart For Its Electric-Only Future Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 20, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News smart fortwo EQ cabrio is the smallest and only electric convertible on the market.Weather maybe wasn’t best for shooting a convertible test drive review, but this sort of weather is common in Copenhagen, Denmark. Anyways, the all-electric smart fortwo EQ cabrio, now with the obligatory EQ sign, seems pretty slick in black-red.The EQ cabrio is significantly more expensive than the gasoline version (some €25,000), but if you live is a sunny state with limited parking space in the city, driving an open-top smart could be a daily de-stresser.It’s smart to go electric 2018 Smart Fortwo Electric Test Drive Review Source: Electric Vehicle News read more

Volkswagen To Open New Electric Car Factory In North America

Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 21, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News See Also VW Concerned Over High Costs Of Electric Car Development & Production Volkswagen hints at a new EV factory in North America.The main production site for the next-generation of electric cars from Volkswagen – I.D. family – is the massive plant in Zwickau in Germany. However, Volkswagen is preparing for production in China and hints at a facility in North America by 2022.There is currently no official decision, announcement or any details, but it’s being discussed.However, it could be too early to celebrate another EV factory in the U.S., as the location could be Mexico instead.“There is no decision done so far,” Thomas Ulbrich, Volkswagen’s board member for e-mobility, told reporters here in Dresden, Germany. “We think there’s a natural fit to Chattanooga, but there’s no planning done so far.” Source: Electric Vehicle News VW Moves Forward With Solid-State Battery Partnership VW Launches New “Electric For All” Campaign – 10 Million EVs! Volkswagen produces cars in the U.S. in Chattanooga, Tennessee, which could be expanded to handle I.D. BEVs.Volkswagen I.D. family:I.D. hatchbackI.D. CROZZI.D. BUZZI.D. VIZZIONI.D. BUZZ CARGOSource: cnet.com read more

Tesla Dashcam TeslaCam Captures Event That Led To Brutal Beating Video

first_img More Tesla Dashcam “TeslaCam” Road Rage Antics Teslacam Dashcam Captures Tesla Model 3 Barely Avoiding Crash Source: Electric Vehicle News Mad Max Motorcycle Road Rage Captured On TeslaCam It turns out that some authorities can use dashcam (TeslaCam) footage if necessary.We’ve been talking for some time about the potential for TeslaCam footage — or any aftermarket dashcam for the matter — to be used by police officers in investigations. While specifics vary by area, it seems dashcam footage may become a thing of the future when it comes to incriminating reckless drivers and dealing with road rage incidents.Read also Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 8, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News According to Teslarati, a Tesla driver from Meridian, Idaho found himself in the midst of a road rage situation that ended badly. He was viciously assaulted by the other driver. Thankfully, his standard Tesla dashcam, which relies on Autopilot cameras, captured and saved the entire event. The Tesla driver incurred several hits to the head, but thankfully, the perpetrator may get charged with assault and battery..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }The victim, Lee Anderson, made a driving move based on instinct that the other driver was unhappy with. Rather than flashing his lights or putting up the signature middle finger, the driver — who had an infant in the car — took matters to the next level. He not only yelled at Lee, but got out of his car and attacked Anderson, with some 20 blows to the head.While Anderson may have confused the other driver, according to the Meridian police department, he didn’t break any traffic laws. Per Teslarati via KTVB-TV, a Meridian police department representative shared:He was following the correct traffic procedures. I think he may have sped up a little bit at the intersection, but he definitely had the right of way. And it’s really not even about the right of way rule. It really is about common courtesy. You don’t know who you’re dealing with in that other vehicle. No reason to try to get into a physical confrontation with anybody.For more information follow the links below.Source: Teslarati via KTVB-TVlast_img read more

BMW says theres no demand for allelectric cars – they are wrong

first_imgAs BMW was announcing an acceleration of its electrification plans, a senior BMW executive told an audience that there’s no demand for all-electric cars.He is wrong. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post BMW says there’s no demand for all-electric cars – they are wrong appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Dallas Morning News – Ira Tobolowsky Law Love Loyalty the Essence of

first_img Remember me Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Lost your password? Usernamecenter_img As a teenager, he delighted in mischievously putting his older sister’s bras in the freezer before her date nights. As a young attorney, he argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, beating a loaded government legal team led by future Justice Samuel Alito Jr. As a single man, he turned down a date with the reigning Miss Universe and instead opted for a first date with a neighborhood girl and they would be married 39 years.Until Friday the 13th, when his colorful 68-year-old life ended prematurely on the floor of the garage in his North Dallas . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Passwordlast_img read more

New Novel Explores Portrait of a Widower

first_imgby, Kavan Peterson, Editor, ChangingAging.orgTweetShareShareEmail0 Shares After Annie, a novel by Michael TuckerBaltimore’s own Michael Tucker, an actor perhaps best known as lawyer Stuart Markowitz on “L.A. Law,” returned to Charm City Sept. 30 to read from his first novel, After Annie, at the Baltimore Book Festival.Our company ChangingMedia was an official sponsor of the book festival and we filmed authors speaking at the main literary salon. I was particularly interested to hear Tucker speak about his novel, which explores life and love after the death of a spouse.Michael was inspired to write the story based on his own relationship with his wife actress Jill Eikenberry — but not the way you’re thinking. Although Jill’s character dies of cancer in chapter four of the novel, she is in fact alive and well and appeared with her husband at the event. Writing the novel, Michael said, was a way for him to express and explore his own terror of potentially losing his life partner, who in fact is a two-time survivor of cancer.The discussion was moderated by Tom Hall, culture editor for “Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast” on Baltimore NPR station WYPR, who spoke for many couples “of a certain age” by asking Michael and Jill what it was like exploring the idea of finding love again after the death of your partner.In the novel, Jill’s character Annie is worried that her husband will not make it on his own after she dies. So Annie actually works to set him up with a young actress in the theater they run so he won’t have to be alone.Jill joked “that’s probably more than I would do,” much to the crowd’s amusement. She also noted that it’s been annoying to have everyone think that she died in real life just because her husband wrote this novel.However, Michael said the novel was based on his single greatest fear — losing Jill — and that the purpose of writing and art is to make some kind of sense out of life, and of course, death.You can watch a brief outtake of the discussion below. I highly recommend watching the full video here, there are lots of funny and poingnant moments.Related PostsSenior TheaterJoin ChangingMedia at the Baltimore Book FestivalGet your hipster reading glasses on because it’s the end of September and time for the 17th Annual Baltimore Book Festival, the one weekend out of the year when we can call Baltimore the “City that Reads” with a straight face.Should People with Dementia Choose their Death?One of my favorite authors is Terry Pratchett, who has created a whole fantasy world called Discworld, and spun it out over 39 novels that are hilarious, insightful, and unbelievably clever. Thief of Time is great in print, but even … Continue reading →TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: books deathlast_img read more

UT Southwestern study reveals structural information for major brain receptor

first_img Source:https://www.utsouthwestern.edu/newsroom/articles/year-2018/brain-receptor-structure.html Jun 28 2018UT Southwestern researchers today published the first atomic structure of a brain receptor bound to a drug used to reverse anesthesia and to treat sedative overdoses.”This study reveals the first high-resolution structural information for one of the most abundant and important neurotransmitter receptors in the brain,” said Dr. Ryan Hibbs, corresponding author of the study published in Nature and Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Biophysics with the Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute at UT Southwestern. “We are tremendously excited about it.”Many drugs – both legal and illegal – work on the GABAA receptor. Particularly well-known are the benzodiazepines, which are used for anesthesia during surgery and prescribed to treat epilepsy, anxiety, and insomnia, he said, adding that solving the structure of the receptor could someday lead to better treatments for those conditions.The GABAA receptor binds to GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid), the major inhibitory, or calming, neurotransmitter in the adult brain. To function properly, the brain needs a balance of stimulating and calming signals, said Dr. Hibbs. Dysfunction of the GABAA receptor is found in conditions marked by excessive excitation in the brain, such as epilepsy. In addition to the benzodiazepine class of sedatives, the GABAA receptor is a common target for barbiturates, anesthetics, and alcohol, he added. All of these drugs act on the brain by increasing the activity of the GABAA receptor, which in turn further dampens, or calms, brain activity.”This receptor is a pharmacological gold mine. However, where these drugs bind and how they exert their effects had not been understood at the structural level, forcing scientists to base their understanding of this receptor on computational modeling,” Dr. Hibbs said.The GABAA receptor has been notoriously resistant to X-ray crystallography. That method – long considered the gold standard of structural biology – requires the crystallization of proteins so that structures can be determined based on X-ray diffraction patterns, explained Dr. Hibbs, an Effie Marie Cain Scholar in Medical Research.Related StoriesResearchers measure EEG-based brain responses for non-speech and speech sounds in childrenNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskDr. Shaotong Zhu, the lead author in this study and a postdoctoral researcher in Neuroscience, pursued the structure by crystallography and obtained crystals that diffracted X-rays very poorly. In parallel, she worked to obtain the structure using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), which was ultimately successful. The results provide the first 3D atomic structures of the receptor bound to its neurotransmitter GABA and to the drug flumazenil, which is used to reverse anesthesia and to treat benzodiazepine overdoses.The researchers obtained the high-resolution structures using the University’s $22.5 million cryo-EM facility, where samples are rapidly frozen to prevent the formation of damaging ice crystals and then viewed at around minus 300 degrees Fahrenheit (cryogenic temperatures). UT Southwestern’s facility – which runs round the clock – is one of the world’s top facilities for cryo-EM structural biology.The researchers devised methods to express and purify the human synaptic GABAA receptor from cells in flasks and used electrophysiological experiments, in combination with the structural information from cryo-EM, to test the effects on the receptor of the neurotransmitter GABA, a benzodiazepine (diazepam), and flumazenil.”We were able to define how GABA binds so selectively to the receptor and to explain why drugs like benzodiazepines and flumazenil – the agent that competes with those drugs at the same binding site to reverse their effects – act specifically on this receptor,” Dr. Hibbs said. “The implications are far-reaching for understanding mechanisms of drug binding and designing new drugs for diverse neurological conditions.”​last_img read more

People with type 2 diabetes likely to benefit from 52 diet study

first_imgIn a paper published in JAMA, UniSA PhD student Sharayah Carter says intermittent fasting could be a solution for people with diabetes who find it difficult to stick to a diet seven days a week.Her findings are based on a year-long clinical trial of 137 people with type 2 diabetes, half of whom followed a 5:2 diet and the others an ongoing restricted diet, consuming between 1200 and 1500 calories a day.Related StoriesHealthy high-fiber diet could reduce preeclampsia riskStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskDiabetes medications mask euglycemic ketoacidosis at the time of surgeryThe study is the first long-term clinical trial comparing the different diets of people with type 2 diabetes.Fasting on two non-consecutive days, consuming between 500-600 calories, and then eating normally for five other days each week not only results in weight loss but also improved blood glucose control.While fasting is safe for people with diet-controlled type 2 diabetes, for those using insulin and other oral medications likely to cause hypoglycemia, blood glucose levels need to be monitored and medication doses changed accordingly, the study authors caution.Sharayah’s co-supervisor, UniSA Professor of Nutrition Peter Clifton, says healthcare costs relating to diabetes are increasing, costing the world around US$673 billion each year and $14.6 billion per year in Australia alone.“It is the 21st century’s health epidemic and the biggest challenge confronting Australia’s health system,” Professor Clifton says.“Conventional weight-loss diets with daily energy restrictions are difficult for people to adhere to so we must look for alternative solutions.”Source: http://unisa.edu.au/Media-Centre/Releases/2018/World-first-study-shows-benefits-of-52-diet-for-people-with-diabetes/ Jul 24 2018People with type 2 diabetes are just as likely to lose weight and control their blood glucose levels if they follow a 5:2 diet than an ongoing daily calorie-restricted diet, according to a world-first study by University of South Australia researchers.last_img read more

In Trumps first year nations uninsured rate unchanged

first_imgPhil Galewitz: pgalewitz@kff.org, @philgalewitz Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 12 2018Despite Republicans’ resistance to the federal health law, the percentage of Americans without health insurance in 2017 remained the same as during the last year of the Obama administration, according to a closely watched report from the Census Bureau released Wednesday.However, the uninsured rate did rise in 14 states. It was not immediately clear why, because the states varied dramatically by location, politics and whether they had expanded Medicaid under the federal health law. Those states included Texas, Florida, Vermont, Minnesota and Oregon.The uninsured rate fell in three states: California, New York and Louisiana.An estimated 8.8 percent of the population, or about 28.5 million people, did not have health insurance coverage at any point in 2017. That was slightly higher than the 28.1 million in 2016, but did not affect the uninsured rate. The difference was not statistically significant, according to the Census report.About 17 percent of Americans were uninsured in 2010, the year the Affordable Care Act was enacted.The Census numbers are considered the gold standard for tracking who has insurance because the survey samples are so large.Analysts credit the health law with helping drive down the number of uninsured. But also a factor: The proportion of people without insurance typically falls as unemployment rates decline. That’s because more people can get health coverage at work or can better afford buying insurance on their own.The nation’s unemployment rate has generally been falling since before 2011 and was 4.1 percent for the last quarter of 2017, the lowest level since before the Great Recession began in December 2007.Critics of the health law said the report emphasized its deficiencies. “Today’s report is another reminder that Obamacare has priced insurance out of the reach of millions of working families,” Marie Fishpaw and Doug Badger of the Heritage Foundation said in a statement. “Despite a growing economy and very low unemployment rate, the uninsured rate remains virtually unchanged.”But the law’s supporters instead saw the glass as half full.”These numbers show the resilience of the Affordable Care Act,” said Judith Solomon, senior fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. She said people still value the coverage they receive from the health law even as it’s been under attack by President Donald Trump and Republicans who want to repeal it. “It’s good news because the numbers show the strength of the ACA but bad news in that we have not seen further progress.”Solomon expressed concern, though, about the large number of states seeing uninsured rates increase.Uninsured rates last year ranged from a high of more than 17 percent in Texas to low of just under 3 percent in Massachusetts.West Virginia had one of the sharpest increases in uninsured.About 14 percent of the state’s residents were uninsured in 2013 before the ACA’s premium subsidies and Medicaid expansion began. That rate fell by nearly two-thirds by 2016. Last year, however, West Virginia’s uninsured rate crept up 0.8 percentage points to 6.1 percent, according to the Census report.Related StoriesAmbulance dispatches for minor injuries soar after ACA expansionEmploying new federal rule on health insurance plans could save moneyUniversal health care for New Yorkers? Not exactlyCarol Bush, 58, of Elkins, W.Va., expects to lose coverage Oct. 1 because her job is ending.The unfortunate twist is that her job, for the past three years, has been working as a navigator helping people in her community find coverage in the health law marketplaces. Federal officials have largely scrapped that program.The Trump administration cut funding by more than 80 percent during the past two years, saying it had no proof that navigators were helping people find coverage. Only if consumers signed up in the presence of the navigator was a session considered a success.Bush had coverage through the University of West Virginia, which has a navigator contract that ends at the end of this month. Without employer coverage, Bush said, the cheapest insurance she could find would be about $1,100 a month. She won’t qualify for a federal subsidy to lower her premium because of her family’s income. Her husband is insured through Medicare.Although she said she has strongly considered going without insurance because of the cost, she knows she needs it.”In all honesty, I’ve always had some kind of health insurance, and the thought of being without it worries me,” she said. “I can’t risk getting seriously ill and incurring enormous debt at this point in my life. Peace of mind has a value too.”Shenandoah Community Health Center, a federally funded health clinic in Martinsburg, W.Va., has started to see an increase in uninsured patients the past year, although it’s still below levels it saw before the health law’s coverage expansion began in 2014, said CEO Michael Hassing. Hassing said he believes many patients have dropped coverage, thinking the ACA’s individual mandate was repealed.”Folks say, ‘I don’t need to have it anymore,’ and they let it go,” he said.While the GOP failed last year to repeal the law, Congress was able to strip out one of its key features — the individual penalty for not having coverage. The vote last December eliminated that penalty starting in 2019 — meaning Americans are still required this year to have health coverage or face the consequences on their 2018 taxes. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Chinese academician snagged in corruption dragnet

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country China’s antigraft campaign has ensnared a leading animal cloning researcher, according to Chinese news reports. The well-respected financial news magazine Caijing says that Li Ning, an animal breeding specialist at China Agricultural University (CAU), is under investigation for allegedly transferring research funds to companies in which he holds majority shares; he has not been seen in public since early July, the report says.When Chinese President Xi Jinping launched an anticorruption campaign at the end of 2012, he vowed to catch both “tigers and flies,” meaning officials at all strata of the nation’s leadership. The biggest catch so far is China’s former internal security czar Zhou Yongkang. Li, who was elected to the Chinese Academy of Engineering in 2007 at age 45, is the first academician targeted in the campaign.Li is a principal investigator on 18 major research projects in China, including the country’s well-funded transgenic project, according to CAU’s website. He is the director of CAU’s national key lab for agricultural biotechnology and leads teams in big animal cloning, stem cell research, and genetic engineering. Li’s bio also boasts of being a partner in the PigBioDiv2 project, a European Union–China collaboration under the European Union’s Fifth Framework Programme that aimed to assess diversity of pig breeds. According to Leif Andersson, an animal geneticist at Uppsala University in Sweden, Li provided tissue samples of Chinese domestic pigs to the project, which ended several years ago. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Using transgenic technology to breed new varieties of crops and livestock is among more than a dozen major projects in China’s 2006 to 2020 science and technology plan. The transgenic project was launched in 2008, with a planned investment of 20 billion yuan ($2.9 billion at 2008 exchange rates, or $3.25 billion at today’s exchange rate). Critics say the transgenic project has concentrated too much funding in too few hands with little accountability and few significant results.According to the Caijing report, Li has access to tens of millions of dollars of research funds. He has also registered several biotech companies over the years, in which he holds controlling shares and serves as company director or manager. He allegedly transferred research funds into some of the companies, the report says. Li could not be reached for comment, and CAU has not commented on the investigation.China’s anticorruption campaign had been cleaning house in academia long before Li’s detention. So far, leaders at 18 universities have been caught up in the sweep, according to various news reports. Last year, Chen Yingxu, a prominent water researcher, was charged with embezzlement. Earlier this year, Shen Weichen, the newly appointed party chief of the China Association for Science and Technology (CAST)—counterpart to AAAS (publisher of ScienceInsider) in China—was detained by the party’s disciplinary body, though his case was not related to his work at CAST. Anticorruption inspection teams have also been sent to major research universities such as Fudan University in Shanghai and the Ministry of Science and Technology. And two cases of alleged bribery by university officials were made public yesterday as well.No official announcement has been made about Li’s case. It could become a test case for the revised bylaws of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Engineering, which list corruption as one of the grounds for stripping away the honorary title of academician.last_img read more

How Earths earliest life overcame a genetic paradox

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) On ancient Earth, the earliest life encountered a paradox. Chains of RNA—the ancestor of DNA—were floating around, haphazardly duplicating themselves. Scientists know that eventually, these RNA chains must have become longer and longer, setting the stage for the evolution of complex life forms like amoebas, worms, and eventually humans. But under all current models, shorter RNA molecules, having less material to copy, would have reproduced faster, favoring the evolution of primitive organisms over complex ones. Now, new research offers a potential solution: Longer RNA chains could have hidden out in porous rocks near volcanic sites such as hydrothermal ocean vents, where unique temperature conditions might have helped complex organisms evolve.Hydrothermal vents are fissures in Earth’s crust that pump out superheated water. They would have been common on early Earth, which was more tectonically active than the planet is today, says Dieter Braun, an experimental biophysicist at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany. The water in hydrothermal vents is particularly rich in nutrients, making them promising sites for the origin of life.To figure out if hydrothermal vents could have given the evolution of complex life a boost, Braun and his colleagues examined the physics of a theoretical single pore in the rock surrounding a vent. The pore is open at the top and at the bottom and filled with a dilute solution of RNA molecules of various lengths. The solution on the hot side—the one closer to the stream of superheated water—would become less dense and rise up through the pore. Some of it would escape at the top, to be replenished by more nutrient-rich fluid entering at the bottom. The remainder would diffuse across to the cold side of the pore and drop back down. A complex physical effect called thermophoresis causes charged molecules in a solution to accumulate in colder water, and the longer chains, having more charge, would do this more often than shorter chains. Therefore, the shorter RNA chains would be more likely to escape out of the top of the pore, whereas the longer ones would stay trapped inside where, continually fed by nutrients, they could reproduce. Better still, Braun says, the continuous temperature cycling could actually help split the RNA double helix apart, making it easier for it to reproduce. To test this elaborate hypothesis, Braun and his colleagues constructed a simulated piece of porous rock from a network of tiny glass capillary tubes heated on one side. They allowed dissolved fragments of DNA to be washed into the tubes from the bottom. Ideally, they would have used RNA, but Braun explains that there’s no good way to reproduce RNA in a lab, whereas it’s easy to reproduce DNA with a standard laboratory process called PCR. “All the thermophoresis and the characteristics of the trapping mechanism are the same for DNA and RNA,” he says. Once they let the experiment run, the researchers found that longer chains of DNA were more likely to accumulate inside the tubes than shorter chains were. As a result, the longer strands reproduced much better inside the pores and their populations grew, whereas the shorter strands were diluted so much that they went extinct, the team reports online today in Nature Chemistry.It’s “nice chemistry,” says marine chemist Jeffrey Bada of the University of California (UC), San Diego, but he is not convinced that hydrothermal vents, or any other likely habitat on early Earth, could have provided the conditions created in the lab: “The processes outlined are not likely to take place on a significant scale on the Earth or elsewhere.” Biochemist Irene Chen of UC Santa Barbara disagrees and even thinks the research opens a door to studying environments beyond just volcanic ones. She suggests rock pores hotter on one side than the other could result from solar, as well as hydrothermal, heating, expanding the types of environments that could have favored the evolution of complex life. A physical environment that could plausibly have existed on the early Earth “actually selects for longer RNA sequences,” she says. “The extra length is basically room for biological creativity.”center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Test your smarts on dinosaurkilling asteroids graying hair and Scott Kellys year

first_img Top Ranker They are replaced by new drugs faster than they can be used up Last week, scientists studying the Zika virus may have finally made the connection between infection and microcephaly, a condition in which the brain fails to grow properly. What was that link? The Science Quiz Lungless salamanders The virus was found in babies’ cerebrospinal fluid The virus was found to kill developing brain cells You Russia 0 / 10 LOADING Economics has joined the reproducibility revolution! A new study, released last week, shows that this percentage of experimental economics papers failed to replicate: Results: You answered out of correctly – Click to revisit Trick question: He grew a beautiful moustache and never left Earth. Average Question NASA/Robert Markowitz Glass frogs Start Quiz Banksy 340 days 3400 days March 07, 2016 The Science Quiz 0 After briefly losing contact with ground control, the weekly quiz is back! Last week, astronaut Scott Kelly returned to Earth after the longest space stay of any American. How long was he flying in his tin can? Banksy. The street artist rose to popularity in the United Kingdom for his politically-themed, satirical artwork, which has appeared on the sides of buildings, rooftops, and even steamrollers. But despite his fame—and numerous exhibits dedicated to his work—his identity has never been verified. Last week, researchers at the Queen Mary University of London used geographical profiling, a statistical technique from criminology and epidemiology, to tag Robin Gunningham as the secretive stencilist. Poison dart frogs Widow’s peak Antonio Lacerda/EFE/Newscom DETLEV VAN RAVENSWAAY/SCIENCE SOURCE The faster you answer, the higher your score! Formaldehyde Score An error occurred loading the Quiz. Please try again later. Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin 30% Mexico. For years, oil prospectors were aware of unusual geologic formations in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. Then, in the 1980s and 1990s, scientists showed that the formations, which extend into the Gulf of Mexico, came from a massive asteroid impact that wiped out most life on Earth some 66 million years ago. Now, scientists are getting ready to sink a diamond-tipped bit into the buried remnant of the asteroid impact. They hope that the retrieved rock cores will contain clues to how life came back in the wake of the cataclysm, and whether the crater itself could have been a home for novel microbial life. Hair curliness 40% One modern-day class of animals fighting for survival is the amphibians. Already threatened by pollution and habitat destruction, many are now falling victim to the deadly Bd fungus. Last week, scientists discovered the pathogen is spreading among this species by hijacking its reproductive activities: 60% Sickboy Next month, scientists plan to dig a 1500-meter deep hole into the Chicxulub crater, left from an asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs—and most life on Earth—66 million years ago. Where is this crater located? Formaldehyde. Last month, the CDC said that excessive levels of the chemical in one brand of laminate flooring could cause irritation and even cancer in two to nine of every 100,000 people who used it. But they made one tiny mistake—when measuring flooring, they forgot to convert square feet into square meters! After correcting their estimate (prompted by this 60 Minutes investigation), they revised the actual cancer risk to between six and 30 of every 100,000 people. Just another danger inherent in the imperial units system. In other health news, a new study has found that nearly $3 billion worth of cancer drugs are thrown away each year. What is the reason? Unibrows Last week, researchers claimed to have used statistical spatial analysis to uncover the identity of this anonymous street artist: They have short shelf lives and expire quickly 50% The virus was found to block maternal blood flow D*face They come in “one-size-fits-all” vials Francisco Huguenin Uhlfelder/Flickr 46% Canada March 07, 2016 340 days. And to be fair, Kelly’s home was not just any tin can—it was the International Space Station, where he spent a year conducting experiments with cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko and providing us with awe-inspiring views of our planet. Kelly is also giving NASA its best opportunity to study the effects of space on the human body, since his DNA double—twin and former astronaut Mark Kelly—stayed on Earth the entire time. The twins have already been tested for changes in their bodily fluids, psychology, and DNA, but so far the most impressive finding is also the most obvious: Due to a lack of gravity and pressure on his spinal column, Scott (right) grew 2 inches taller than the mustachioed Mark! Human growth hormone Mexico The virus was found in babies’ brain tissue Japanese tree frogs Glyphosate They come in “one-size-fits-all” vials. Even when a patient’s required dose is much lower, many drug companies offer their vials in only one size. And because of safety concerns, hospitals can keep these surplus drugs on hand for just 6 hours—after which they have to pitch the rest into the trash. Up to 30% of some drugs are thrown out in this way, earning drug companies millions of dollars annually on medicine that never reaches patients. South Africa Last week, the American company Lumber Liquidators reported a big drop in sales, blamed on an updated U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report warning about high levels of this cancer-causing chemical in laminate flooring: Hospitals are routinely ordering the wrong drugs Time’s Up! Japanese tree frogs. Woe unto the hapless females, who prefer deeper, longer, faster mating calls. A new study has shown that male tree frogs infected with Bd are much more likely to produce these kinds of calls than their uninfected brethren. No one is sure just how this happens—it could be that they’re trying to get in one more good round before they go, or it could be that the fungus is acting like a parasite that turns its host into a serenading zombie. The finding, one of the first to show that the pathogen can change reproductive behavior, could explain why frogs and related animals are continuing to disappear across the globe. Obey Widow’s peak. The V-shaped hairline is an inherited trait, but it has never been linked to a single gene or set of genes. Beard thickness now is, according to new research. So are at least six other traits, including hair shape, hair color, eyebrow thickness, and—to Nicolas Cage’s chagrin—the existence of unibrows.The new study, which looked at the genomes of more than 6000 people from Latin America, identified 18 genes that appear to influence hair traits, including the first ever to be associated with graying. That gene variant, found only in people with European ancestry, had previously been associated with light hair colors. 46%. The archetypal U.S. innovator is not a young, white college dropout like Bill Gates, but is instead a middle-aged male Ph.D. who was either born abroad or the child of immigrant parents. The new study, put out by the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, also found that most U.S. innovators work at large firms with more than 500 employees. Just 12% are women, and less than 8% of those born in the United States belong to a minority group. 40%. When a massive replicability study in psychology was published last year, the results were shocking: 60% of the 100 experimental results failed to replicate. Now, the latest attempt—this time with experimental economics—has also found a substantial number of duds. Following the same protocols of the original studies, researchers failed to reproduce the results in seven of 18 cases, or about 40%. Why? Some experts say such failures are an inevitable part of social science, especially when the numbers are so small. And even small changes in the context of an experiment can have a big effect. For example, one study—looking at the effect of happiness on economic decisions—featured a performance by actor Robin Williams. After the actor’s suicide in 2014, the study, perhaps unsurprisingly, failed to replicate. A new survey has looked at who becomes “high-value” innovators in the United States. What percentage of them are foreign-born or the children of immigrants? The virus kills developing brain cells. Scientists are racing to discover how Zika, which is rapidly spreading throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, could cause brain defects in babies. Early last month, the virus was reported to have been found in fetal brain tissue; unpublished reports also reveal the virus in babies’ cerebrospinal fluid. But this week, two new laboratory studies suggest that the virus preferentially kills developing brain cells. The observation bolsters the growing case for a connection between the virus, which is spreading rapidly across Latin America, and an increase in the number of cases of microcephaly. 72% Beard thickness 11% Speaking of mustaches, a new study has linked 18 genes to several follicular traits—including hair graying. Which of the following is not one of those traits? Share your score 34 days 29%last_img read more

New Horizons reveals a snowman at the edge of the solar system

first_imgNASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute Email LAUREL, MARYLAND—Humanity is getting its first good look at a primordial planetary building block, in images sent back by this afternoon by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft after its flyby of MU69, a small icy body at the far fringes of the solar system.For a half-year, the New Horizons team had puzzled over the possible shape of MU69, which was little more than an oblong dot in Hubble Space Telescope images. Is it two icy objects orbiting each other, or a single “peanut”? It turns out to be both. Resembling a 33-kilometer-long interplanetary “snowman,” in the words of Alan Stern, a planetary scientist from the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in Boulder, Colorado, and principal investigator for the $800 million mission, MU69 appears to have formed when two spherical objects gently smooshed together billions of years ago. Mutual gravitational attraction keeps them married despite their gentle, 15-hour rotation. “What you’re seeing is the first contact binary ever explored by a spacecraft,” Stern said today at a press conference here at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.The 140-meter-resolution image, taken 28,000 kilometers from MU69 half an hour before the spacecraft’s closest approach, reveals two bumpy, reddish spheres, with one three times the volume of the other. The object has a mottled look, with the bright patches concentrated in mysterious circles while the darker areas seem more linear. The “neck” between the two lobes is particularly bright, perhaps because small, reflective particles tumbled into its crevasse, said Cathy Olkin, a deputy project scientist and planetary scientist at SwRI. Although the photo doesn’t show shadows, MU69’s profile suggests it could have hills as tall as a kilometer. New Horizons reveals a ‘snowman’ at the edge of the solar system Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Paul VoosenJan. 2, 2019 , 5:30 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe MU69 appears to have few craters or other signs of violent impact, supporting the idea that the solar system’s building blocks formed when friction and gravity gently drew together clouds of dust and gravel—a theory known as pebble accretion. Closer to the sun, these building blocks would go on to form Earth, Mars, and all the other planets. But in the Kuiper belt, the region of icy bodies beyond Neptune, they formed but did not evolve further, said Jeff Moore, a planetary scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, and the mission’s geology lead. Kuiper belt objects “are the first planetesimals,” he said. “These are the only remaining basic building blocks.”Seeing one close up could clear up many debates. For example, comets that visit Earth from the Kuiper belt have had a peanutlike profile similar to MU69, prompting debate about whether they were sculpted by the sun’s heat or looked that way from the start. The latter now seems likely. “This really puts the nail in the coffin now,” Stern said. “We know this is how many objects like this form.” (The discovery also suggests the rubber-duck comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was actually the first contact binary to be explored by a spacecraft when the European Space Agency’s Rosetta visited it in 2014.)The MU69 story is only starting to unfold, Stern added. Less than 1% of the data has returned so far. More will be presented tomorrow, perhaps giving a better indication of its composition. New Horizons’s journey into the solar system’s past has just begun.*Correction, 3 January, 10:55 a.m.: This story has been updated to note that MU69 may not be the first contact binary visited by a spacecraft.last_img read more

United States extends fetal tissue contract and revives one experiment

first_img “We are working with NIH to extend the contract. We remain confident that the critically important work of the lab will be continued,” UCSF said in a statement.NIH has also revived an HIV experiment that was derailed last fall, days after the Trump administration launched a review of all U.S. government–funded research that uses fetal tissue donated by women after elective abortions. The study was being conducted at NIAID’s Rocky Mountain Laboratories (RML) in Hamilton, Montana, where scientists receive fetal tissue that they use to create mice with humanlike immune systems. Lab dish studies had led them to believe that an antibody might prevent HIV from establishing reservoirs in the human body. They were preparing to use the humanized mice in a trial testing the antibody when they received an order from HHS directing them to stop acquiring fetal tissue from Advanced Bioscience Resources, a company in Alameda, California. (Days earlier, HHS had canceled a Food and Drug Administration contract with the company.)The HHS order “effectively stops all of our research to discover a cure for HIV,” Kim Hasenkrug, lead scientist at RML, wrote at the time to a collaborator, Warner Greene of the Gladstone Center for HIV Cure Research in San Francisco.Alerted to the experiment’s derailing, Lawrence Tabak, deputy director of NIH, said in December 2018 that the stoppage had resulted from a miscommunication. “We’re now figuring out ways to address that,” Tabak said at that time.Since then, NIH has found another fetal tissue supplier for the scientists at RML. This allowed the antibody experiment to launch last month, Greene told ScienceInsider yesterday, with 18 mice receiving the antibody and 18 control mice not receiving it. Another cohort of 22 treated mice and 22 controls was launched in early February, and the RML investigators expect in March or April to receive additional mice that will allow more cohorts to be tested, Greene said.“Our studies are back on track, thanks to the efforts of the NIH,” says Greene, whose lab did early experiments that revealed the antibody’s potential role, and then provided the antibody for the studies. “I just want to emphasize how gratifying it has been to work positively with the NIH on this to solve this problem.” Greene declined to say what supplier is providing fetal tissue for the experiments.Renate Myles, an NIH spokesperson, wrote in an email today: “The HHS audit is in no way intended to impede research. The delay in Hasenkrug’s research was unintentional and the issue was remediated once we were made of aware of the need for new [fetal tissue] procurement.”But research advocates praised the NIH for acting. “It’s very important that NIH is finding ways to continue this critical research. The development of these fetal tissue mice currently is the state of the art” in key areas of HIV research, says Sally Temple, scientific director of the Neural Stem Cell Institute in Rensselaer, New York, and a former president of the International Society for Stem Cell Research.NIH estimates it will spend $95 million on projects involving human fetal tissue this year, down from an estimated $103 million in 2018.The Susan B. Anthony List, an antiabortion organization, declined to comment. (In September 2018, the group spearheaded a letter from 45 groups to HHS Secretary Alex Azar that complained about U.S. funding for research that uses fetal tissue, helping catalyze the HHS review.) David Prentice, vice president and research director at the Charlotte Lozier Institute in Arlington, Virginia, the research branch of the Susan B. Anthony List, said he was unavailable for comment.Brett Giroir, the physician-scientist who is assistant secretary for health, is leading the broad review of U.S.-funded fetal tissue research that was launched in September 2018. Spokespeople at HHS did not respond to questions about the UCSF contract renewal and the status of the 5-month-old review, including when it might wrap up.Update, 25 February, 2:41 p.m.: After deadline, an HHS spokesperson responded by email to ScienceInsider’s questions about the review’s status, writing: “We will provide an update on the review once it has concluded and as appropriate.”  The email also stated that NIH responded for the department on questions about the UCSF contract renewal. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe United States extends fetal tissue contract and revives one experiment Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/National Institutes of Health (CC BY-NC) By Meredith WadmanFeb. 22, 2019 , 1:25 PM The U.S. government’s leading medical research agency is quietly extending and reviving research that relies on human fetal tissue, even as President Donald Trump’s administration ponders the future of the controversial work in a far-reaching review.Early this month, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, told researchers it intends to extend a key agency contract that funds work using human fetal tissue to develop mice used to test drugs against HIV. Without NIH action, the $2 million annual contract between its National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), will expire on 5 March.Normally, the contract, which has been in place for years, is renewed each December. But in December 2018, NIH extended it for just 90 days. Officials said the shorter renewal was a response to an ongoing review of federally funded fetal tissue research by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and that no final decision on the contract’s fate would be made until that review was complete. The newest extension would keep the contract alive for an additional 90 days, through 5 June, according to a 7 February letter from NIH to UCSF obtained under the Freedom of Information Act. Scientists at the federal Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana, ​have restarted an HIV study that was interrupted by an order to stop acquiring human fetal tissue.last_img read more

One dead three severely injured after explosion at Indian shock wave lab

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Pallava BaglaDec. 6, 2018 , 4:40 PM Email One dead, three severely injured after explosion at Indian shock wave lab Pallava Bagla NEW DELHI—The explosion of a gas cylinder left one researcher dead and three others seriously injured yesterday in a shock wave lab at one of India’s premier research facilities. It’s unclear what caused the blast, which took place at 2:20 p.m. local time at the Laboratory for Hypersonic and Shock Wave Research of the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bengaluru.The explosion shook the entire neighborhood, according to scientists from the nearby National Institute of Advanced Studies. Manoj Kumar, 32, an employee of a startup named Super-Wave Technology, died on the spot, IISc says. The three wounded were employees of the company as well. The startup was launched in 2016 by two faculty members of IISc’s aerospace department.IISc’s shock wave lab opened half a century ago; it was upgraded in 2011 with funding from BrahMos Aerospace, a joint Indo-Russian venture that makes a supersonic cruise missile called BrahMos. Researchers at the lab have developed several potential applications for shock waves, including the delivery of drugs and vaccines, artificial insemination of livestock, oil extraction, and even the production of fruit juice. The facility now houses four sophisticated shock wave tubes that can use liquid hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and helium to generate shock waves.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The main building of the Indian Institute of Science in Bengaluru “There was no fire, it was an explosion of a gas cylinder,” IISc Director Anurag Kumar, an electrical engineer, tells Science. Kumar declined to speculate on the cause of the accident and confirmed IISs is cooperating with a police investigation, while the institute’s safety office is conducting its own audit. Students and researchers at IISc do not go through a mandatory safety training, Kumar says: “It is left to individual professors to instruct the staff on safety as they are the most knowledgeable about the equipment they handle.”IISC, which employs about 450 scientists on a sprawling campus, has “a very good safety record,” says biochemist and former IISc Diretor Padmanabhan Balaram, who says this is likely the first death because of a research-related accident in the institute’s 110-year history. Balaram worries the accident could put a dampener on shock wave research, a promising field in which IISc has invested “handsomely,” he says.Kumar says there will be suitable compensation for the injured and the family of the deceased scientist.*Update, 7 December, 7 p.m.:  According to The NEWSMinute, an online portal, Indian police on 7 December “booked” IISc professors G. Jagadeesh and KPJ Reddy for allegedly “causing death by negligence” and “causing grievous hurt by act endangering life or personal safety of others.” Jagadeesh and Reddy manage Super-Wave Technology Private Limited, the company that employed Kumar and his three injured colleagues.*Correction, 7 December, 7 p.m.: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that BrahMos is the world’s only supersonic cruise missile. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Utah Cop Pulls Gun On Mentally Disabled Child

first_img Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago “In this case, it happened so quickly,” Soffe said. “I do not blame him one bit for not thinking about, ‘I gotta have my camera before I get out and, you know, confront this suspect who may have a gun.’”Hrubes’ family attorney strongly disagreed.“Suppose they had said the shooter was white,” Karra Porter said. “Do you think they would have pulled a gun on every white person they saw?”Local activists have also noted that the police changed its account of what happened multiple times. According to Deseret News, in initial statements, police did not say any of the suspects were Black. Police initially said one suspect was described as Hispanic but the race of the second suspect was unknown by officers. But during the Monday press conference, Soffe claimed the officer pointed his gun at Hrubes because he matched the description.“They have yet to tell the same story twice,” Black Lives Matter organizer Josianne Petit said of Woods Cross police version of events.An independent investigation of the incident is underway, but the officer in question has not been placed on administrative leave. Local activists believe the fact that the officer was able to go back to work sends a strong message about how they feel about Black lives. Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored More By Megan Sims DJ Hrubes was playing in his grandmother’s yard in the town of Woods Cross on June 6 when a white police officer suddenly pulled up, pointed his weapon at the child and ordered him to get on the ground. Hrubes immediately complied. The officer then left as suddenly as he had arrived. Authorities would later reveal that they were looking for armed robbery suspects, who were described as Black. Hrubes’ mother, Jerri, who is white, claimed her son did not have any objects in his hands at the time the officer pulled up and said there was “clear prejudice.”Jerri said she called the Woods Cross Police Department afterward to file a formal complaint against the officer. After making the call, the officer came by their home to apologize for pulling a gun on the child.Woods Cross Police Chief Chad Soffe defended the unidentified officer’s actions during a press conference on Monday following the backlash. That was in spite of the fact that the officer reportedly ignored departmental policy and failed to turn on his body camera when he confronted Hrubes. According to the Huffington Post, it is department policy for officers to turn on their body cameras when they get out of their vehicles to confront a suspect. A Complete, Recent Timeline Of Disaster For Americans Visiting The Dominican Republic Caribbean beach full of tourists Black Lives Matter , DJ Hrubes White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversity It’s been all but a tradition for white cops to brandish their guns — and use them — when Black “suspects” are in the equation. But that troubling apparent rite of law enforcement passage has been extended to Black children lately and now one family is demanding answers after an officer was allowed to keep his job following an episode where he pulled his gun on a developmentally disabled and visually impaired 10-year-old in Utah. “The fact that this police officer still has a job, and they’ve defended his actions, sends a message that any officer can go out, aim a gun at a 10-year-old kid, and that’s OK,” said Lex Scott, founder of a Utah Black Lives Matter Chapter. “And that’s not OK to do.”SEE ALSO:Who is Brandon Webber? Everything To Know About The Black Man Killed By U.S. Marshals In MemphisBoom! Elizabeth Lederer, Lead Central Park 5 DA, Resigns From Columbia Universitylast_img read more

Phoenix Councilman Defends Rogue Cops In Viral Video

first_img Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist More By NewsOne Staff The Phoenix police department is under fire after their officers, who still work for the notoriously corrupt department, threatened to kill a Black family over a doll possibly being stolen from a store. Community members have been protesting and now City Councilman Sal DiCiccio had a temper tantrum because of a constitutional right to peacefully demonstrate.On Wednesday, DiCiccio whined that the police aren’t happy and said it’s not nice to call them racists before he dropped this gem: “You are anarchists and you are out to destroy the city.” viral video of father speaking with baby son A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family Here are the 4 officers, and badge numbers, that we know of so far that were on the scene of this brutal act of police violence/terrorism in Phoenix.Christopher Meyer 06254Nicholas Welch 09372Agnes Milbourn 09118Brian Herricht 09054 https://t.co/pROqeEw7Qj— Shaun King (@shaunking) June 16, 2019The May 29 video shows a Phoenix police officer screaming threats and profanity toward the couple,  Dravon Ames, 22, and his pregnant fiance Aisha Harper, 24, and their two young daughters.“You’re gonna fucking get shot!” the cop yells at one point.“I’m gonna put a fucking cap in your fucking head,” he said in another instance. 35 Positive Images Of Black Dads That Shatter False Stereotypes On Father’s Day He also made sure to point out that he is Italian, though it was unclear what relevance he was trying to establish by offering up that tidbit.Protesters were demanding that the $721 million budget for police should not be passed until the police officers are fired, according to the Washington Post.On Tuesday, Police Chief Jeri Williams promised change at a meeting at a downtown church, but told the crowd, “Real change doesn’t start with the police department, real change starts with our community.” Williams was wildly booed from the crowd with one person shouting, “Real change starts with the firing of the officers! Fire them!”Williams then jumped up trying to defend her bizarre comments. The Phoenix police department originally refused to release the names of the involved officers. However, Twitter users did their research. According to activist Shaun King, the cops were identified as Christopher Meyer, Nicholas Welch, Agnes Milbourn and Brian Herricht. See the tweet below, which also includes their badge numbers. “My hands are up! My hands are up!” 22yo Dravon Ames says as a Phoenix police officer yells to “get your fucking hands up.” The same officer later says “You’re gonna fucking get shot!”Ames says the officers stopped him after his child walked out of a Dollar Store with a doll. pic.twitter.com/Nlkd7IXsyc— Meg O’Connor (@megoconnor13) June 12, 2019Meyer also pointed a gun at the group threatening to shoot them and demanding Harper put her baby on the hot ground despite the fact she could not walk. And all of this because a four-year-old allegedly took a 99 cent doll. Following the outrage, Jay-Z‘s philanthropic organization within his entertainment company ROC Nation offered to provide legal support to Ames and Harper, who filed a claim on Thursday demanding $10 million from the city of Phoenix.SEE ALSO:Sudan Is Burning But People Don’t Care Because It’s Not A CathedralBlack Teacher Gives Students Haircuts For Graduation Aisha Harper , Dravion Ames , Phoenix Police Department last_img read more

Choose your 2018 Breakthrough of the Year

first_img 8% 20% By Science News StaffNov. 28, 2018 , 9:00 AM Voting has not started. Voting begins Wednesday, 28 November Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Read More Development cell by cell Fly brain revealed 6% Time is running out. Vote Now! Neutrinos from a blazing galaxy 2% Read More 00 Seconds Rapid chemical structures Thank You for Voting! Thanks for voting! Scroll down to see current voting results. Read More 500-million-year-old animals Sort by ranking 6% Read More 14% Read More 00 Days 2% Read More Read More Editor’s note: We originally included the claim of gene-edited babies as a candidate; we have since removed it to avoid giving the mistaken impression that Science endorses this ethically fraught work. An ancient human hybrid Read More Ice age impact Forensic genealogy comes of age #MeToo makes a difference Read More Read More Scroll down to see final results. 4% 5% Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) 2% 10% Vote for your Breakthrough of the Year 2018! 00 Minutes Email Read More It’s that time of the year again: Science’s reporters and editors are homing in on the Breakthrough of the Year, our choice of the most significant scientific discovery, development, or trend in 2018. That selection, along with nine runners-up, will be announced when the last issue of the year goes online on 20 December.You can get in on the action! Pick your favorite breakthrough from the candidates below by Wednesday, 5 December. Then check back on Thursday, 6 December, when we will start a second round of voting with your four top picks. We will announce the winner—the People’s Choice—along with Science’s choice on 20 December.Cast your vote today! Choose your 2018 Breakthrough of the Year! 00 Hours Voting ends on Thursday, 6 December. 22% An RNA drug enters the clinic An astronomical data trove Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Read More How cells marshal their contents Submit Vote Thank You for Voting! Scroll up to see current voting results. Be sure to check back on Thursday, 6 December, when we’ll start a second round of voting with your top four picks.last_img read more

How do you take a hamsters pulse

first_img By Sarah CrespiFeb. 13, 2019 , 2:00 PM How do you take a hamster’s pulse? Researchers took the same technology that is normally used to track goods in a warehouse and used it to measure vital signs such as breathing and pulse in small animals including turtles, fish, and birds. The technique avoids having to shave, sedate, and generally stress out small pets and lab animals for basic veterinary care. Watch the video to learn more.last_img