Eustace Conway Faces Building Code Violations

first_imgNorth Carolina mountain man Eustace Conway has canoed 1,000-miles down the Mississippi River, hiked the entire Appalachian Trial, and ridden across the continental United States on horseback in 103 days. Now he must face a new type of challenge: building codes for his Blue Ridge outdoor education and retreat center, Turtle Island.Conway, who appears on the History Channel’s reality program “Mountain Men,” had a surprise visit from Watauga County officials last fall to his Turtle Island preserve. The investigation found multiple building, health, and fire infractions at Conway’s retreat, though the outdoorsman told the Wall Street Journal that such codes do not apply to what they are doing at Turtle Island, where school groups, scouts, and families have gone for more than 25 years to “rough-it” in the woods.The preserve has been shut down indefinitely, and Conway has been ordered to modernize or demolish the compound’s buildings. The battle isn’t over yet, though — Turtle Island has many supporters, and there is a petition on Change.org urging the North Carolina Building Codes Council to alter state code and exempt Turtle Island. So far the petition has 13,000 signatures and counting.last_img read more

El Salvador Deploys Air Force Contingent To UN Peacekeeping Mission

first_img“We have done so as part of our foreign policy and also in gratitude for the peacekeeping efforts that occurred in El Salvador, which ended in 1992. Now, we cooperate with international peace efforts. So much so that we have participated in missions in Iraq, we have sent contingents for three-and-a-half years to Afghanistan, we now have a contingent in Lebanon – where we have had a presence for six years – and we have been in Haiti for two years, working on the reconstruction efforts in that country,” he said. In addition to solidifying El Salvador’s relationships with other countries, participating in peace missions also makes pilots and mechanics more effective, and helps optimize their training.“This peacekeeping mission will obviously raise the prestige of the Salvadoran Army’s Air Units,” said Pedro Trujillo, director of the Institute of Political Studies and International Relations at Francisco Marroquín University in Guatemala. Providing such assistance “opens up a lot of doors.” “This is a very special situation because, for the first time, a Salvadoran Military contingent is going to work independently (without the assistance of other countries) in support of a UN Peacekeeping Mission,” Salvadoran Defense Minister Major General David Munguía Payés said on February 11 at the United Nations headquarters in New York. About 90 Salvadoran Air Force members are preparing to deploy to Mali to serve in the country’s first Air Force contingent to participate in the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA). That mission, Col. Palacios Garay said, “will last one year. But El Salvador is prepared to stay in Mali for five years, depending on the UN mandate.” That mission, Col. Palacios Garay said, “will last one year. But El Salvador is prepared to stay in Mali for five years, depending on the UN mandate.” In addition to the Mali assignment, Salvadoran Troops are also donning blue helmets in UN peacekeeping missions in Haiti and Lebanon. Additionally, in early December 2014, the United States Southern Command’s (SOUTHCOM) Command Surgeon’s Office joined the Defense Institute for Medical Operations (DIMO) to provide the Salvadoran Military with a pre-deployment course on Ebola precautions, recognition, and response in an effort to support their peacekeeping operations (PKO) forces preparing to replace their counterparts in Mali. “The instruction was focused on how work is done in the desert and a survival course for crew members in case of accidents,” said Col. Palacios Garay. “The maintenance specialists concentrated on what preventive care the aircraft will need because of the sand, desert elements and the temperature.” Mission will bring positive attention to Salvadoran Military In an interview with Diálogo in December 2014, General Rafael Melara, Chief of the Joint Staff of the Salvadoran Armed Forces, explained that the country’s military is not only bound by Constitutional mandates to defend the nation and its territorial integrity, but also to cooperate with international peace efforts. Most of the UN peacekeepers — Military and police contingents, as well as civilians — are working in northern Mali. In order to prepare the contingent’s primary quarters, an initial group of officers is scheduled to arrive on March 23; the rest will arrive between April 15 and 25. They’ll be based in Timbuktu, near the desert, under the command of Colonel Juan Aníbal Hernández Lara. El Salvador took steps toward joining that peacekeeping effort on January 8, when the Legislative Assembly approved the deployment of Troops to participate in the UN PKO mission. The countries of El Salvador and Mali established diplomatic relations on September 23, 2014, at UN headquarters. Participating in the UN mission in Mali will improve the experience and prominence of the Salvadoran Armed Forces, which is well known for its involvement in UN peace keeping operations. Most of the UN peacekeepers — Military and police contingents, as well as civilians — are working in northern Mali. In order to prepare the contingent’s primary quarters, an initial group of officers is scheduled to arrive on March 23; the rest will arrive between April 15 and 25. They’ll be based in Timbuktu, near the desert, under the command of Colonel Juan Aníbal Hernández Lara. “Every Air Force mission is a risky mission,” Col. Palacios Garay said, but added that “the situation in Mali is progressing as expected. They informed us that there had been a decrease in the level of hostilities because of the negotiations that the UN is conducting with the insurgents.” In an interview with Diálogo in December 2014, General Rafael Melara, Chief of the Joint Staff of the Salvadoran Armed Forces, explained that the country’s military is not only bound by Constitutional mandates to defend the nation and its territorial integrity, but also to cooperate with international peace efforts. Training for the UN mission In addition to solidifying El Salvador’s relationships with other countries, participating in peace missions also makes pilots and mechanics more effective, and helps optimize their training.“This peacekeeping mission will obviously raise the prestige of the Salvadoran Army’s Air Units,” said Pedro Trujillo, director of the Institute of Political Studies and International Relations at Francisco Marroquín University in Guatemala. Providing such assistance “opens up a lot of doors.” About 90 Salvadoran Air Force members are preparing to deploy to Mali to serve in the country’s first Air Force contingent to participate in the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA). There, they’ll provide security to both UN Forces and civilians; among other tasks, Salvadoran pilots will conduct reconnaissance missions using three MD500 helicopters from their Air Force fleet. El Salvador took steps toward joining that peacekeeping effort on January 8, when the Legislative Assembly approved the deployment of Troops to participate in the UN PKO mission. The countries of El Salvador and Mali established diplomatic relations on September 23, 2014, at UN headquarters. Training for the UN mission Participating in the UN mission in Mali will improve the experience and prominence of the Salvadoran Armed Forces, which is well known for its involvement in UN peace keeping operations. center_img To prepare for the mission, Salvadoran officers received five months of peacekeeping training – including a visit from members of the United States Military, which traveled to El Salvador to share their experiences working on the peacekeeping mission. “The instruction was focused on how work is done in the desert and a survival course for crew members in case of accidents,” said Col. Palacios Garay. “The maintenance specialists concentrated on what preventive care the aircraft will need because of the sand, desert elements and the temperature.” “We have done so as part of our foreign policy and also in gratitude for the peacekeeping efforts that occurred in El Salvador, which ended in 1992. Now, we cooperate with international peace efforts. So much so that we have participated in missions in Iraq, we have sent contingents for three-and-a-half years to Afghanistan, we now have a contingent in Lebanon – where we have had a presence for six years – and we have been in Haiti for two years, working on the reconstruction efforts in that country,” he said. By Dialogo March 23, 2015 The UN’s mission was established on April 25, 2013, and deployed a few months later, on July 1, with the goal of stabilizing the situation in the northern region of the country, which is the scene of conflict between the government and and armed guerrilla groups. MINUSMA currently has about 9,900 Troops. There, they’ll provide security to both UN Forces and civilians; among other tasks, Salvadoran pilots will conduct reconnaissance missions using three MD500 helicopters from their Air Force fleet. To prepare for the mission, Salvadoran officers received five months of peacekeeping training – including a visit from members of the United States Military, which traveled to El Salvador to share their experiences working on the peacekeeping mission. Residents of the northwest African nation are anxious to greet the first group of officers. “Relations in Mali are very close. Mali was warm in welcoming our contingent to help in the peacekeeping mission,” said Colonel Juan Ricardo Palacios Garay, chief of the General Staff of the Salvadoran Contingent in Mali. “We hope to be up to their standards, and we will do our utmost to complete this mission.” While it is not expected to engage in armed conflict, the Salvadoran contingent is prepared for it. “This is not a combat mission, but there could be incidents there in which our forces must use their weapons,” Munguía Payés said during a speech ahead of the deployment of the country’s 10th military group to the peace keeping mission in Lebanon, according to Contacto Hoy. MINUSMA peacekeepers were deployed in 2013 The country’s contingent joins other peacekeeping groups which are deployed to what is called the Azawad Strip, where isolated jihadist groups, in addition to Tuareg rebel groups, frequently attack the Malian Army, MINUSMA, or rival groups . Mission will bring positive attention to Salvadoran Military The country’s contingent joins other peacekeeping groups which are deployed to what is called the Azawad Strip, where isolated jihadist groups, in addition to Tuareg rebel groups, frequently attack the Malian Army, MINUSMA, or rival groups . While it is not expected to engage in armed conflict, the Salvadoran contingent is prepared for it. “This is not a combat mission, but there could be incidents there in which our forces must use their weapons,” Munguía Payés said during a speech ahead of the deployment of the country’s 10th military group to the peace keeping mission in Lebanon, according to Contacto Hoy. “This is a very special situation because, for the first time, a Salvadoran Military contingent is going to work independently (without the assistance of other countries) in support of a UN Peacekeeping Mission,” Salvadoran Defense Minister Major General David Munguía Payés said on February 11 at the United Nations headquarters in New York. MINUSMA peacekeepers were deployed in 2013 “Every Air Force mission is a risky mission,” Col. Palacios Garay said, but added that “the situation in Mali is progressing as expected. They informed us that there had been a decrease in the level of hostilities because of the negotiations that the UN is conducting with the insurgents.” Additionally, in early December 2014, the United States Southern Command’s (SOUTHCOM) Command Surgeon’s Office joined the Defense Institute for Medical Operations (DIMO) to provide the Salvadoran Military with a pre-deployment course on Ebola precautions, recognition, and response in an effort to support their peacekeeping operations (PKO) forces preparing to replace their counterparts in Mali. The UN’s mission was established on April 25, 2013, and deployed a few months later, on July 1, with the goal of stabilizing the situation in the northern region of the country, which is the scene of conflict between the government and and armed guerrilla groups. MINUSMA currently has about 9,900 Troops. Residents of the northwest African nation are anxious to greet the first group of officers. “Relations in Mali are very close. Mali was warm in welcoming our contingent to help in the peacekeeping mission,” said Colonel Juan Ricardo Palacios Garay, chief of the General Staff of the Salvadoran Contingent in Mali. “We hope to be up to their standards, and we will do our utmost to complete this mission.” In addition to the Mali assignment, Salvadoran Troops are also donning blue helmets in UN peacekeeping missions in Haiti and Lebanon. Heroes that will be never forgotten because they gave their lives for the sake of peace and world security.last_img read more

5 Suffolk Home Invasions Reported in 1 Week

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Five armed home invasions have been reported in Suffolk County in a week—two on Sunday alone—but despite eight arrests, three of the cases are so far unsolved, authorities said.None of the incidents appear to be random and the victims in some cases knew their attackers, authorities said. The incidents occurred in Mastic, North Lindenhurst, Dix Hills, Huntington and Coram between Jan. 15 and Jan. 22. Five were nabbed in the Huntington case and three were busted for the North Lindenhurst case.The first case came when police said a Mastic woman reported a pair of masked gunmen broke into her Wills Avenue home, stole her iPhone and fled at 2:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 15. The victim reported that one assailant was wearing a Spiderman mask.Then at 10:30 p.m. Sunday, three Brentwood men—one armed with a handgun—forced their way into a North Lindenhurst home on Feustal Street, where they stole cash and cell phones from the victims inside. The trio was arrested shortly afterward.A half hour later, two masked gunmen walked into a Dix Hills house on Deer Park Avenue through an unlocked door, pistol-whipped a man and woman inside and fled with the victims’ wallets and cell phones, police said.“They appear to be targeted locations,” Second Squad Det. Sgt. Richard Auspaker said of the Dix Hills case and the arrest of five men for an alleged home invasion in nearby Huntington two days later. “It’s possibly related.”In the Huntington case, police said three suspects entered a home on Leigh Street through an unlocked door, threatened five residents inside and demanded cash while the other two suspects acted as lookouts outside at 1:20 a.m. Tuesday.All five men fled in a Lincoln but were apprehended shortly later on Deer Park Avenue in Dix Hills, police said. Two guns were allegedly recovered.And in the fifth case in the eight-day span, police said four men forced their way into a Coram home on Townhouse Road, one suspect displayed a rifle and the group tied up a woman and three children at 9:30 p.m. Monday. It’s unclear what the suspects stole.The victims in the Dix Hills case were treated for minor injuries at Huntington Hospital. The victims in the other four cases were not injured.No arrests have been made in the Mastic, Coram or Dix Hills cases. A police spokeswoman said the Mastic and Coram cases were also believed to be targeted.“It doesn’t appear that these two are related to other precincts,” Auspaker said of the Huntington and Dix Hills home invasions versus the other three.last_img read more

A better way for Bill Gates to fix schools

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in the San Diego Union-Tribune: Bill Gates has been one of the world’s richest people for decades.To build a legacy beyond Microsoft — and to build a better world — in 2000 he and his wife launched the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has spent billions of dollars on numerous good causes. The world’s largest private charity has had some great successes — helping sharply reduce the prevalence of malaria worldwide, for one.But the Gates Foundation’s efforts to improve U.S. public education haven’t gone as well as hoped.Gates even admitted that in remarks last month at an education conference. As a result, he said the foundation is “evolving our education strategy“ as it looks to invest close to $1.7 billion in U.S. public schools over five years. While the Gates Foundation has funded many education initiatives, its biggest splash came with its Common Core campaign, launched in 2009.Forty-two states are in the program, which mandates centralized curriculum standards for student learning in math and language arts in each grades K-12.Test results are used to rate school and teacher effectiveness. But Common Core has come under fire from teachers unions and their political allies because of its emphasis on testing and teacher accountability.And Common Core faces criticism from conservatives because it seeks to require independent-minded states to use standards mandated at the national level.Bipartisan opposition to top-down education policy-making is why Congress scrapped the No Child Left Behind education law in 2015 and shifted school responsibilities back to the states.  Since 1984, the Texas government has passed a series of education reforms that — like those in Massachusetts — set up basic accountability requirements for schools and districts while tracking the performance of four student groups: whites, Hispanics, African-Americans and the economically disadvantaged.A 2015 Urban Institute report ranked Texas behind only Massachusetts and New Jersey in school quality in an evaluation that adjusted for student demographics. Gates seeming to lose faith that Common Core can succeed will be music to the ears of people like Gov. Jerry Brown, who famously rapped the “siren song“ of trendy school reform in 2011.But no critic can explain away the years of comprehensive success seen in Massachusetts and Texas.Whether you live in a red state or a blue state, no one should accept so-so schools.There is a better way. More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes These changing political waters suggest that if the Gates Foundation truly wants to advance public education, the last thing it should do is advocate national standards.Instead, it should urge states to copy what has worked in other states.This approach would be much more difficult to criticize than Common Core. In liberal, pro-union states like California, an educational campaign that pointed to how much better the public education system is in liberal, pro-union Massachusetts could build momentum for change.The Massachusetts Education Reform Act of 1993, crafted with input from teachers, established standardized basic methods to assess the performance of students, teachers, administrators and superintendents and hold them accountable.While Massachusetts has clusters of struggling students in poor minority communities, its public schools are widely seen as America’s best. In conservative, non-union states wary of national dictates, an educational campaign could emphasize how much better the public education system is in conservative, non-union Texas.last_img read more

West Yorkshire industrial Not so grim up north

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Ruhan homes in on £450m Brum project

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Polished Ilva

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Unai Emery explains why Granit Xhaka was not in Arsenal’s squad to face Bournemouth

first_imgEmery recorded the biggest win of his reign at Arsenal so far (Picture: Getty)Asked if Xhaka was alright, Emery explained at his post-match press conference: ‘Yeah he’s ok. Today he was rested.’AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTIn Xhaka’s absence, Lucas Torreira and Matteo Guendouzi both started, though the latter was at fault for Bournemouth’s consolation goal.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThere was another injury worry when Sead Kolasinac was withdrawn after 57 minutes against Bournemouth, and Emery says he has to be managed very carefully.He continued: ‘Kolasinac has been having a problem in his muscular and sometimes he’s telling us to rest some matches, some minutes. Advertisement Kolasinac recorded an assist before coming off in the second half (Picture: Getty)‘The first half he finished it well but in the dressing room he said he can continue but he was feeling some pain.‘Can continue, but I prefer to change him for rest and also he played Sunday with a big intensity and today we can do the change and carry on with another player.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Emery ‘proud of every player’ following Arsenal’s win over BournemouthTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 8:10FullscreenEmery ‘proud of every player’ following Arsenal’s win over Bournemouthhttps://metro.co.uk/video/emery-proud-player-following-arsenals-win-bournemouth-1872720/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 27 Feb 2019 11:23 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Unai Emery explains why Granit Xhaka was not in Arsenal’s squad to face Bournemouth Comment The Swiss midfielder played 90 minutes against Southampton at the weekend (Picture: Getty)Granit Xhaka is not suffering from an injury and was simply rested for Arsenal’s Premier League win over Bournemouth on Wednesday night at the Emirates.The Swiss midfielder, who has been in excellent form this season, was omitted entirely from Unai Emery’s 18-man squad as the Gunners ran out easy 5-1 winners.Some fans had feared that Xhaka had picked up another knock – having missed games against Manchester City and Huddersfield in February – but Emery says he is fine for the weekend’s north London derby. Advertisementlast_img read more

Arsenal hopeful Aaron Ramsey will be fit for Newcastle clash

first_imgArsenal hopeful Aaron Ramsey will be fit for Newcastle clash Coral BarryMonday 25 Mar 2019 1:45 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link248Shares Comment Ramsey is suffering from a thigh injury (Picture: Getty)Arsenal fans will be waving goodbye to Ramsey this summer when the 28-year-old’s contract ends and he joins Juventus.Ramsey was forced to leave the Emirates after Arsenal withdrew their contract offer last year.But with Arsenal fighting for Champions League qualification and to make the final of the Europa League, Unai Emery will want Ramsey fit for selection.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves Advertisementcenter_img Ramsey withdrew from the Wales squad (Picture: Rex Features)Arsenal are hopeful Aaron Ramsey will be available to play against Newcastle on Monday, reports say.The midfielder was forced to withdraw from international duty with Wales last week after picking up a thigh problem.Ramsey was set to feature for Wales against Slovakia, but returned to Arsenal when feeling pain in his left thigh. Advertisement Arsenal play Newcastle in seven days’ time (Picture: Getty)The Evening Standard claim that although Ramsey is yet to be assessed by Arsenal’s medical team, there is a confidence it is a minor injury.ADVERTISEMENTArsenal resume club action against Newcastle in a week’s time and believe Ramsey will shake off his thigh injury by then.AdvertisementAdvertisementIt is believed the Welshman has not sustained a tear, but instead is suffering from tightness.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man Citylast_img read more

Kenya makes major security reshuffle

first_imgKenya’s government on Wednesday announced major changes in its administrative and security personnel, with a clear focus on tackling the worsening insecurity linked to Somalia’s Al-Qaeda-affiliated Shabaab rebels.Interior minister Joseph Nkaissery said the changes will “strengthen efforts to combat the threat of terrorism and the creeping threat of violent extremism, bring an end to the menace of cattle rustling and enhance the campaigns against illicit alcohol, drug trade and substance abuse.”The reshuffle is “crucial to responding effectively to the current security threats facing us,” he added.The movements bring in a new Nairobi police chief and county commissioner, as well as the county commissioner and other key positions in the counties of Mandera, Wajir and Garissa, which border Somalia. A new police chief was also appointed in the restive port city of Mombasa, where police are struggling to tackle both a Shabaab recruitment drive in the Muslim-majority coastal region – something which has dented the key tourism sector – as well as a worsening drugs problem.Nkaissery was appointed interior minister in December last year, after his predecessor Joseph Ole Lenku was sacked following a wave of attacks and massacres carried out by Somalia’s al-Qaeda-affiliated Shabaab rebels.Kenya has been battling an upsurge in cross-border attacks by the Shabaab, which have seen the militants carry out several massacres with apparent ease – including the mass murder of 148 people, most of them students, at Garissa university earlier this year.The Shabaab also killed at least 67 people in the September 2013 suicide assault on the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi.The upsurge in cross-border attacks and the emergence of Kenya-based Shabaab cells is now seen Kenya’s number-one security headache, and a strategic blow given that Kenya deployed troops into southern Somalia in 2011 in the hope they would serve as a buffer and protect the long, porous border.last_img read more