Big Quiz of the Year winners

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS John Lewis, Caerphilly, Mid GlamorganEdward Simpson, Farnham, SurreyPaul Whitney, Cheltenham, GloucestershireIRB Yearbook Vera Fenwick, Hucclecote, GloucestershireAllison Bradley, Leamington Spa, WarwickshireOllie Pollard, address withheldChris Darch, Keynsham, AvonRobert Geist, address withheldStephen Ward, Johnstone, RenfrewshireGraham Norton, Maidstone, KentMr RM Thompson, Bristol Here are the winners of the Big Quiz of the Year, as featured in the January edition of Rugby World. Click here for all the answers! If your name is on here but we don’t have your address, please email [email protected] cans of Guinness Will Nunn, DublinPuma rugby ballJeff Ferris, BristolDavid Prettyjohns, Cosby, LeicestershireGordon Noakes, Market Deeping, CambridgeshireKeith Moore, Aldershot, HampshireJohn McKinnell, Bude, CornwallMrs SM Harris, Nuneaton, WarwickshireA case of GuinnessJulie Fenwick,  address withheldTom Kilburn, Hinckley, LeicestershireJon Warren, Bristolcenter_img John Evely, LeicesterCPJ Drache, Bathlast_img read more

Ulster v Edinburgh: The Preview

first_img TAGS: Edinburgh RugbyUlster EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND – JANUARY 22: Edinburgh Rugby wing Tim Visser in action during the Pool two match between Edinburgh Rugby and London Irish at Murrayfield Stadium on January 22, 2012 in Edinburgh, Scotland. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Ulster by seven. There’s no doubt Edinburgh will put in a hearty performance but the Northern Irishmen’s combination of power and experience will break the Scots down.Can Ulster stop Tim Visser?ULSTER v EDINBURGH, SATURDAY 28 APRIL, AVIVA STADIUM, KICK-OFF 5.45pm. ULSTER: Stefan Terblanche; Andrew Trimble, Darren Cave, Paddy Wallace, Craig Gilroy; Paddy Jackson, Ruan Pienaar; Tom Court, Rory Best, Declan Fitzpatrick, Johann Muller (capt), Dan Tuohy, Stephen Ferris, Willie Faloon, Pedrie Wannenburg.Replacements: Nigel Brady, Paddy McAllister, Adam Macklin, Lewis Stevenson, Robbie Diack, Paul Marshall, Ian Humphreys, Adam D’Arcy.EDINBURGH: Tom Brown; Lee Jones, Nick De Luca, Matt Scott, Tim Visser; Greig Laidlaw (capt), Mike Blair; Allan Jacobsen, Ross Ford, Geoff Cross, Grant Gilchrist, Sean Cox, David Denton, Ross Rennie, Netani Talei.Replacements: Andrew Kelly, Kyle Traynor, Jack Gilding, Steven Turnbull, Roddy Grant, Chris Leck, Phil Godman, Jim Thompson.Referee: Romain Poite Johann Muller celebrates beating Munster in the Heineken Cup quarter-finalBy Bea Asprey, Rugby World writerUlster are favourites to reach their first Heineken Cup final since 1999 on Saturday, but Edinburgh will arrive in Dublin preparing to put up a fight. The Scots have never reached this stage of the tournament before, but despite having a poor season in the RaboDirect Pro12 they overcame the odds to beat Toulouse in the Heineken Cup quarter-final at Murrayfield, and will run out at the Aviva Stadium confident that they are capable of causing another upset.Fan base  Ulster are the home side and as such they will enjoy the majority of the support on Saturday, but Edinburgh are expecting between four and five thousand of their own fans to make the trip to Dublin. While their numbers may pale in comparison to those of the Ulstermen, this is a big achievement for a club that was playing in front of crowds that size in the early stages of the tournament. Furthermore, official fan zones have been set up in Edinburgh where people can go to watch the game, and the Heineken Cup fever will filter through to the team and give them a welcome boost.No pressure Edinburgh can enjoy playing this game with the knowledge that they have nothing to lose. Their Heineken Cup campaign has already been a success and if they reach the end of the road on Saturday they will still return to Scotland as heroes. Ulster, however, have the uncomfortable pressure of being favourites, and will only be happy if they reach the final. They have been knocking on Europe’s door for a couple of seasons, but their historical win over Munster to earn them a semi-final spot will have been in vain if they don’t back it up.Stephen Ferris is a powerful cog in Ulster’s back rowPower struggleThere’s no doubting the influence that Ulster’s overseas signings have had, and Johann Muller has brought great leadership and a winning mentality to the province. Despite their All Black prop John Afoa missing out due to suspension, they still have plenty of big hitters and strong ball-carriers in the team, with Muller combining with Dan Tuohy in the second row, and the formidable back row of Stephen Ferris, Willie Faloon and Pedrie Wannenburg. With that trio running at them all day, Edinburgh will have a job to withstand the pressure.Young guns  Ulster have raised eyebrows by bringing in a number of overseas players, but they’re also developing a number of young stars who are benefiting from training with experienced internationals day in day out. Winger Craig Gilroy and Paddy Jackson, who gets the nod over Ian Humphreys at fly-half, are two glimmers of a bright future for the province and Ireland, and though Edinburgh have their own try-machine in Tim Visser, Gilroy will be looking to match his performance against Munster at the Aviva Stadium (click here to see his try at Thomond Park).The verdict  LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

RWC 2015: The countdown is well and truly on

first_imgDoing it for the kids: ER 2015 ambassador Lawrence Dallaglio hopes the World Cup will inspire a new generationBy Owain JonesAMID GREAT fanfare in the cavernous Live Room at Twickenham, Debbie Jevans, CEO of ER2015, and assembled rugby dignitaries, sat at the raised top table to announce the fixtures and venues for the 2015 Rugby World Cup.Amid the usual platitudes and soundbites on a sun-soaked morning at Twickenham, it was the eye-watering numbers that stood out, showing how far the games has progressed since England last hosted the Rugby World Cup in 1991.Brett Gosper, the IRB Chief Executive announced that the competition would be viewed by a global audience of 4 billion across 207 ‘territories’ with the proceeds from the 44-day tournament represent 92 per cent of the IRB’s revenue to inject into the game. They project revenue from the tournament will reach a none-too-shabby £300mTop table: Assembled dignitaries explain ER2015’s visionThere will be 2.65 million tickets released to the public, most likely in early 2014 – which is a reduction of 300,000 on previous estimates, mainly due to Old Trafford withdrawing last month.This last fact has raised real concerns of ticket price hikes, in order for the ER2015 to meet targets set by the IRB, including an £80m staging fee.In all, there will be 48-games crammed into an exhaustive six-week schedule that will take rugby around England at 13 stadiums, nine of which are at football stadiums, or as Jevans tactfully put it, ‘multi-sport venues’.The organisers were proud to announce that  92 per cent of the population would be within 50 miles of one of the stadiums. It will still be a testament to the organizers if they can mobilise the casual fan to games and reach the 2.3m ticket sales needed to break-even, especially when the behemoth that is the Premier League is in full flow.Tournament ambassador Lawrence Dallaglio started the call-to-arms by asking for ‘the whole country to be up on its feet.’The geographic spread is all part of a wider vision to spread the game in non-traditional rugby areas, with the North East (St James’ Park), North-West (Etihad, Elland Road) selected. However, with 16 matches taking place within London, at Wembley, Twickenham or the Olympic Stadium, there have already been claims that the tournament is too ‘London-centric’. These claims were swiftly and politely rejected.Work to do: Olympic Stadium has five matchesTraditionalists will also be smarting, pointing to the fact that only two Aviva Premiership grounds, Sandy Park and Kingsholm, will host games, with those at Franklins’ Gardens and Welford Road, upset to have been overlooked.The Tigers, who this week have provided six Lions to the squad, have found it especially difficult to reconcile the fact that their atmospheric old ground has been overlooked for the newer Leicester City Stadium, which lies just half-a-mile away, and houses 6,000 more seats.Dallaglio was quick to point out that the Tigers had already used the stadium for larger Heineken Cup matches.One winner from the fixture schedule appears to be the WRU and the Welsh economy who were quick to trumpet a £100m boost to the economy after securing eight games, but crucially, not the key England and Australia games. This despite a tongue-in-cheek invitation from WRU Chief Executive Roger Lewis.Those mouth-watering tests will take place at Twickenham, as RFU Chief Executive was keen to point out, ‘it’s our World Cup’.Despite expected gripes given by fans and the media over ticketing and location, by October 31, 2015, when the final whistle blows on the tournament, ER2015 will hope they can look back on the most (commercially) successful tournament in rugby history. We wish them luck. LONDON, ENGLAND – MAY 02: A general view of The Olympic Stadium, one of the Venues for the IRB Rugby World Cup 2015 at Olympic Stadium on May 2, 2013 in London, England. The 13 Match Venues and Host Cities selected are: Twickenham Stadium (London), Wembley Stadium (London), Olympic Stadium (London), Millennium Stadium (Cardiff), Manchester City Stadium (Manchester), St James? Park (Newcastle), Elland Road (Leeds), Leicester City Stadium (Leicester), Villa Park (Birmingham), Kingsholm Stadium (Gloucester), stadiummk (Milton Keynes), Brighton Community Stadium (Brighton) and Sandy Park (Exeter). (Photo by Tony Marshall/Getty Images for IRB) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img ER2015 VenuesWembley Stadium (90,256 capacity)Twickenham (81,605)Millennium Stadium (74,154)Olympic Stadium (54,000)St James’ Park (52,409)Etihad Stadium (47,800)Villa Park (42,785)Elland Road (37,914)Leicester City (32,312)Brighton Community Stadium (30,750)Stadium MK (30,717)Kingsholm (16,115)Sandy Park  (12,300)last_img read more

Gilbert launch the 2019 Rugby World Cup ball – the Sirius

first_imgAn enhanced grip pattern on the match ball will facilitate handling at next year’s World Cup in Japan. Ian Savage, the brains behind Gilbert’s shiny new Sirius, explains more Four years ago, the Match-XV had a softer feel and repelled water more efficiently, aiding grip, but the number of changes to a rugby ball are shrinking as we get closer to perfection.“It’s a fine-tuning process really,” concedes Savage. “I think there will always be scope to improve (a ball) just with the way technology has moved forward. But there are certain things defined by World Rugby that we can’t change, and therefore the areas in which we can, we’re always trying to push those boundaries.“Ultimately the improvements are going to be smaller as we continue to move forward, because we’ve made some pretty incredible jumps in the last 12 years.”All in order: Gilbert Match XV balls lined up at an Argentina training session in 2015 (Sportsfile/Getty)The Sirius will be used in anger for the first time in this weekend’s Japan-New Zealand match in Tokyo, and thereafter will be on view across the autumn Test programme.Gilbert officially supply 16 of the 19 teams that have qualified for Japan 2019 – one of the exceptions being New Zealand – and that will become 17 out of 20 should Canada or Germany clinch the remaining spot via the repêchage.Handling is one thing, kicking is another. Goalkicking success rates typically hover around the early to mid 70% bracket, and while past masters like Wilkinson and Carter are no longer around, Owen Farrell, Leigh Halfpenny and Greig Laidlaw are at the forefront of an equally impressive current generation.KICK SUCCESS AT THE PREVIOUS FOUR WORLD CUPS2003 – 72.5%2007 – 73.4%2011 – 63.6%2015 – 74.9%“There are some fantastic kickers around but there are some elements they’ll have to adjust to playing in Japan,” says Savage. “Most players have played in England and New Zealand and France, they’re established international venues. But Japan will be new for a lot of players. The longer the players have got exposure to the (Sirius) ball, the better the scenario.” New star: the Sirius has the largest total surface area of any international match ball produced to date Gilbert launch the 2019 Rugby World Cup ball – the SiriusAnother piece of the 2019 World Cup jigsaw has slotted in with the launch of the official match ball for the tournament – the Sirius. Named after the brightest star in the night sky, it has been two years in the making and is the seventh World Cup ball to be created by Gilbert.Almost all of the features present in the Match-XV ball used at RWC 2015 remain, with the one notable difference being the use of a sharper pimple to provide better grip, especially in wet conditions.“Due to different manufacturing techniques that we’ve developed over the last two to three years, we’ve been able to get much more definition on the pimple. That’s the technical difference,” explains Ian Savage, Gilbert’s ball engineer.“You have to balance how the aerodynamics work with the pimples. You could make a ball really grippy by making the pimples a lot higher, but you wouldn’t be able to kick the ball in the same manner; it would be too aerodynamically unstable.“It’s a balancing act, so what we’ve done with the Sirius is to change the definition of the pimples without changing the height; that’s why the aerodynamics are maintained whilst improving the grip.”THE WORLD CUP BALLS1987 Mitre Multiplex       1991 Adidas Webb Ellis             1995 Gilbert Barbarian                    1999 Gilbert Revolution                          2003 Gilbert Xact                                 2007 Gilbert Synergie                                        2011 Gilbert Virtuo                                              2015 Gilbert Match-XV                                                    2019 Gilbert SiriusAt the 2003 World Cup in Australia, Fiji blamed the “slippery” silicon ball covering for their error-strewn display against USA, while four years later New Zealand expressed criticism after Dan Carter missed five out of nine kicks against Scotland.Jonny Wilkinson also struggled off the tee in 2007 and it emerged that match officials had over-inflated the balls, despite being given clear instructions.Fast but loose: Fiji criticised the ball after their 2003 win over USA in Brisbane (AFP/Getty)For France 2007, Gilbert addressed the issue of slipperiness by creating a dual-height pimple and switching from a round pimple to a star-shaped one. Then, in 2011, they changed the shape of the valve to enhance the rotational consistency as the ball travelled through the air.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Official Gilbert Rugby World Cup 2019 Sirius match balls will be available online from 1 December; official RWC 2019 replica match balls are available now.Sharpshooter: England’s Owen Farrell converts a try at the 2015 World Cup (World Rugby/Getty Images)last_img read more

Australia: Vigils held for asylum seeker who died on Manus…

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion [Diocese of Melbourne] An estimated 15,000 people took part in candlelight vigils around Australia on Feb. 24 for Iranian asylum seeker Reza Berati, who died as a result of violence at the Manus Island detention center on Feb. 17.Melbourne Anglican priest the Rev. Jasmine Dow was among the 5,000 people gathered in Melbourne’s Federation Square.She said, “The “Light the Dark” vigils were advertized only 32 hours before thousands of people gathered around Australia to mourn the death of Reza Berati on Manus Island under Australia’s watch. Not only did we mourn Reza’s death, but also Australia’s unethical and inhumane treatment of refugees and asylum seekers.“At the Federation Square vigil the mood was sombre. The presenters spoke with a clear and unified message. We stood listening, with our candles lighting the darkness, in the hope that our corporate voice would be heard; a voice that says that the actions of our government are done not in our name, a voice that says the current solution is ‘wrong’, a voice that calls for another way, a way of compassion.“When I reflect on the vigil, I can’t help but reflect on our own faith confession: Jesus, light of the world.  This ‘light of the world’ was himself a refugee. I am challenged by the vigil and by our faith confession on what the church will do, or is doing, as the Body of Christ, to light the darkness of Australia’s refugee policy. How we will hold the leaders of our nation accountable?”In commenting on Reza Berati’s death in a media statement on Feb. 20, Bishop Philip Huggins, chair of the Anglican Church’s Migrant and Refugee Working Group, said that the federal government’s policies on asylum seekers must be reviewed.“A civilized government must be able to control its refugee intake without resort to measures of intentional cruelty,” he said.“We have previously been a generous nation towards refugees. Refugees’ contributions have, thereafter, enriched our common wealth. Our own history tells us what blessings follow when the spirit and detail of the Refugee Convention is honored. Conscience cries out for a review of current implementation measures.” Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Emma HalgrenPosted Feb 26, 2014 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Australia: Vigils held for asylum seeker who died on Manus Island TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

NYC racial reform network lives out ‘Beloved Community’ mission

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Angustia Hamasaki says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group October 26, 2017 at 3:05 am Faithful relationship to God and living witness of the words is the way to heal our races, our lands, our churches, our homes and families. With humility, obedient and loving heart to God. With all your help Holy Trinity to us all. In Jesus loving name we pray. Amen. Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Comments (2) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Forrest Anderson says: NYC racial reform network lives out ‘Beloved Community’ mission Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rahson Johnson (right), a member of the Circles of Support advisory board, spoke to the crowd as moderator Dawn Jewel Fraser (left) listened at the Fit the Description interactive film series and discussion Oct. 24, at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Harlem, a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Rahson Johnson stood behind the microphone, in front of the ornate altar at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Harlem, the northern Manhattan neighborhood in New York City. He looked at more than 200 people filling the pews on the evening of Oct. 24, recalling two critical moments as a 16-year-old growing up in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood.The first critical moment: His friends told him to get the gun from his apartment.He did, and they played around, doing nothing, really. The police came by. On instinct, Johnson ran, so he was chased. He tossed the gun in a flower pot and continued running. Police tackled him, beat him up and arrested him, telling him he was no good, even though he turned out not to be the suspect they were looking for.Regardless of his noncriminal past, Johnson fit the description.Attendees heard and offered all sorts of perspectives at the evening’s #KnowJusticeHarlem, a film and interactive discussion brought by the Fit the Description series organized by the Circles of Support Advisory board, which is comprised of formerly incarcerated people, including Johnson. Circles of Support is a local Harlem re-entry partnership that cultivates leadership among the formerly incarcerated, their families and faith leaders to strengthen communities.The second critical moment Johnson recalled at the event was the day he returned from a harrowing seven days at Rikers Island prison complex. Those same neighborhood kids put another gun in his hand. What did he do? Johnson took it. Not long afterward, Johnson was jailed again, this time for 23 years, on armed robbery charges.“Did I deserve to be put in prison? Yes,” Johnson told the crowd. “Did I deserve to be treated by the police the way I was? Probably not.”Maybe if there were more support for people re-entering society after their prison release, Johnson’s repeated criminal activity might not have happened. Maybe if the relationships, procedure and accountability between police of any color and black men, in particular, were better, then the first incident wouldn’t have happened, or the situation wouldn’t have escalated to the point of arrest.These points were worth a deep-dive conversation.“Think of the ways people have assumed you have fit the description, and think of the ways you fit others into a description,” discussion moderator Dawn Jewel Fraser told the crowd. Later, she said, “We realize this conversation is only a first step.”Left to right: Rahson Johnson, the Rev. Matt Heyd, Lamont Bryant, Thomas Edwards, the Rev. Mary Fouke and Barbara Barron participated in the Fit the Description interactive film series and discussion Oct. 24, at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Harlem, a neighborhood in New York City’s Manhattan borough. Photo: Angela JamesMany of the children and adults who attended the event have been directly impacted by the criminal justice system and mass incarceration. Several of the men from the film were there to speak to the gathering. In the film, eight men — four black police officers and four black civilians from New York City — met for the first time, face to face, to talk about the relationship between police and black men, sharing stories of their experiences, their feelings and the motivations behind their actions.The Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry for racial reconciliation, evangelism and creation care, sat in the first-row pew. Looking at the “awesome” crowd, Sellers was overjoyed at seeing Curry’s “Becoming Beloved Community” initiative on racial reconciliation in action.Many Episcopal churches are engaged in re-entry programs in which the mentors and mentees serve and change each other for the better, she said. Also, the Episcopal Church is about to put together an advisory group on criminal justice ministries to help more churches figure out how to engage in these efforts.“This is not only a chance to talk about Beloved Community, but to act on it,” Spellers said. “Unfortunately, our church has benefitted so much from systems of injustice and oppression. We have a special responsibility to dismantle those systems of privilege.”Left to right: Thomas Edwards, Clifton Hollingsworth Jr., the Rev. Stephanie Spellers and Harold Thomas participated in the Fit the Description interactive film series and discussion Oct. 24, at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Harlem, a neighborhood in New York City’s Manhattan borough. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceThe Oct. 24 program also received support from the J.C. Flowers Foundation, Episcopal Charities of New York and a network of seven Episcopal churches in Manhattan committed to the kind of criminal justice reform that’s rooted in the lived realities of actual people with the highest amounts of police contact. The J.C. Flowers Foundation works with a wide range of partners to solve critical health and social problems affecting hard-to-reach communities. The foundation looks for communities often overlooked by traditional donors.Founded by Episcopalians Anne and Chris Flowers, the organization was born after they saw the malaria epidemic up close on a trip to Africa in 2004 and then started the highly successful Nets for Life program, said Susan Lassen, the foundation’s executive director. The Flowerses used the same model to involve churches and communities in Harlem, training people and allowing them to do the work to help themselves. “It’s a unique way of looking at sustainable change,” Lassen said.Left to right: Dawn Jewel Fraser, Clifton Hollingsworth Jr., Harold Thomas, Thomas Edwards and Rahson Johnson participated in an interactive panel discussion at the Fit the Description interactive film series and discussion Oct. 24, at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Harlem. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceChange happens on a church-by-church basis.St. Philip’s Church has been working on improving post-incarceration re-entry from a number of different angles, said the Rev. Chloe Breyer, associate priest at St. Philip’s, as well as executive director of the Interfaith Center of New York.For example, volunteers from St. Philip’s provide drinks, snacks and “cheerful conversation” for people checking in with their parole officers at the Harlem Community Justice Center. Parolees often have to wait for hours before seeing an officer. Missing parole is a common reason men get sent back to prison, and men 18 to 35 years old are at the highest risk of becoming repeat offenders, Breyer said.“Our pastors can be a listening ear and offer spiritual support, but not from a sectarian point of view,” Breyer said. She pointed to an evaluation of the Harlem center’s Reentry Court, which revealed a 19 percent reduction in re-convictions among participants three years following their release from prison.Also in Harlem, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church Manhattanville hosts support network meetings for formerly imprisoned people, offering resources for those who have no place to live, no food or no medicine, as well as community gardening and movie nights. The congregation has members who were formerly incarcerated.“There’s a need in the community to get support right after they get out of prison,” said the Rev. Mary Foulke, rector of St. Mary’s. “The cards are stacked against them, and we as a church can help make things easier for them.”— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn. She can be reached at [email protected] Racial Justice & Reconciliation TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC October 29, 2017 at 12:27 am Johnson’s hat is SUCH a nice touch!! Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL By Amy SowderPosted Oct 25, 2017 Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

Episcopal News Service digest of COVID-19 news from around the…

first_imgThe church’s COVID-19 news digest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 “This project resurrects and reinvents the steeple as a beacon for community interaction in our post-modern, pluralistic world,” Sparks said.Friday, May 22COVID-19 patient thanks Fort Worth priest whose blood donation may have saved his lifeA Fort Worth, Texas, priest who was the first documented case of COVID-19 in his county got to meet another COVID-19 patient whose life he may have saved by donating his blood.The Rev. Robert Pace, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church, spent three days in the hospital and two weeks in quarantine at home in March. After he recovered from the virus, he donated his blood plasma, which contains antibodies that can fight COVID-19. The Food and Drug Administration is approving (on a case-by-case basis) the use of blood plasma from people who have recovered from the virus as a treatment for patients currently suffering from it.Pace was one of the first COVID-19 plasma donors in Texas, KDFW-TV reported, and his plasma was used to treat Jose Martinez, a healthy 42-year-old who had become critically ill after contracting the virus. According to KDFW, Martinez had been in the hospital for 21 days — and on a ventilator for 11 — when doctors administered the plasma treatment, which dramatically improved his condition. Martinez was discharged from the hospital a week later.On May 20, Martinez and his family met and thanked Pace in the hospital chapel’s garden, presenting him with a statue of St. Michael the Archangel.“I’m just so honored and overjoyed to meet Jose and see him standing here and meet his family,” said Pace, adding that he is continuing to donate plasma and encouraging anyone who has recovered from COVID-19 to do the same.“You can save a life by just sitting down and giving your plasma,” Pace told KDFW.Wednesday, May 20Presiding Bishop congratulates Seminary of the Southwest graduates in online ceremonyGraduations have continued during the coronavirus pandemic, but not in the traditional way. The Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas, held its graduation on May 20 through a livestream, which included video remarks from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.“You are beginning or continuing ministry following in the footsteps of Jesus of Nazareth in a world such as this, in such a time as this,” Curry said, speaking for about five minutes. “I want to congratulate you for having the courage to do it. I want to thank you for having the faith to do it.”Texas Bishop Andrew Doyle also appeared on the livestream to congratulate the new graduates, and Bishop Suffragan Kathryn Ryan was awarded an honorary degree by the Episcopal seminary. The Very Rev. Migelina Howell, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Hartford, Connecticut, was the commencement speaker.“This seminary has trained you precisely to thrive in a rapidly changing world and to be adaptive and nimble, so today we celebrate,” Howell said.You can watch the full ceremony here. Tuesday, April 21Episcopal school in Hawaii makes protective equipment using 3-D printersWhile classes have been canceled at ‘Iolani School in Honolulu, Hawaii, the largest Episcopal school in the United States, there’s still a flurry of activity in the school’s 3-D printer studio. At the request of Hawaii Pacific Health, the K-12 school has produced thousands of face shields for doctors, nurses and other essential workers. The masks are already being used by hospitals, fire departments and police departments in Hawaii.“We have this amazing design team and laser cutters. We have 3-D printers,” said Taylor Wong, a technology teacher at the school. “When we have the resources and are able to do stuff like this, it’s our responsibility.” Thursday, March 19In Wisconsin, phone calls to parishioners and a freezer stocked with foodWith worship services canceled at Trinity Episcopal Church in Oshkosh, the Rev. Chris Arnold, the rector, is overseeing a team of parishioners who have organized a frozen meal ministry for church members who are able or willing to leave their home. Starting March 18, the congregation is launching a weekly phone call ministry to check on every family in the church directory.“We’re trying to find ways of not relying on email, because some of our members don’t have a computer,” Arnold said. In a city of about 66,000, Trinity is the only Episcopal congregation, and its typical Sunday attendance of a little more than 50 is much older than the general population, he said.Arnold credits the work of a group of about a half dozen women in the congregation who previously had wanted to bring back a ministry of preparing meals for grieving families after funerals. Instead, they now are filling the church’s freezer with soups and stews – Arnold contributed his lentil soup – so the ready-made meals can be distributed to households identified as needed them during the rounds of phone calls.Arnold also is considering ways of offering parishioners devotional experiences in the church, such as by inviting them to the church on a weekday afternoon to pray individually, since they won’t be able to gather there as a group.“My hope that we will actually wind up learning how to take care of each other as a community better,” he said. “We may be turned upside down for a while but it’s not going to shake the eternal promises of the Gospel.”– David PaulsenNew Jersey bishop holds virtual town-hall meetings with lay leadersBishop Chip Stokes of New Jersey is keeping lay leaders in his diocese in the loop with a weekly Zoom meeting.“As we all continue to deal with our responses to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, Bishop Stokes is holding weekly town-hall meetings with lay leaders,” the Diocese of New Jersey writes. “It’s a chance to ask questions, share information, or even just to vent and to pray in community with other lay leaders.”The meetings will take place on Zoom every Thursday at 7 p.m. until further notice, starting March 19, and lay leaders can join here.– Egan MillardTwo ukuleles, three Durfees and the Way of LoveAs the coronavirus dominates headlines and social media feeds, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Napa, California, shared this video of their ukulele-playing parishioner Stephen Durfee and his sons, with an upbeat message: The Way of Love. Friday, March 27Texas priest recovering from COVID-19 returns to lead worship The Rev. Robert PaceThe Rev. Robert Pace, one of the first Episcopal rectors to test positive for COVID-19, has recovered enough to lead his church’s livestream worship services again. The 53-year-old rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Fort Worth, Texas, was briefly hospitalized but has been released from quarantine after two negative tests confirmed he no longer has the virus, according to the Diocese of Fort Worth.“I am feeling much better,” Pace said in a diocesan announcement. “I still have to rest more than my ‘normal,’ but I am so much better. My voice is finally returning, and I am planning to lead Morning Prayer and preach from Trinity this Sunday.”Pace will lead Morning Prayer, which is available by Zoom and Facebook Live, at 9:30 a.m. on March 29. It will be the first worship service he has led since Ash Wednesday (Feb. 26).COVID-19 Anglican Alliance resource hubA new resource hub has been published by the Anglican Alliance to highlight the key areas of church responses to COVID-19 and provide links to useful guidelines. The hub has been developed by the alliance after its global team connected with churches in each region to learn about their experience and gather examples of effective responses.The alliance held a series of regional and global consultations to learn from responses across the provinces and is also engaging with the World Health Organization and with other Christian and secular agencies to learn from their expertise.More details can be found here.Thursday, March 26Massachusetts church helps knitters make masks for hospitalsDoctors and nurses treating COVID-19 patients face the additional challenge of a shortage of masks and other protective gear. Knitters around the United States, like Cathy Racine of Charlton, Massachusetts, are responding by making homemade masks, which — though not ideal — may provide some temporary protection until proper masks arrive.Racine and other volunteers put together kits to make hundreds of masks for nearby hospitals and distributed them at Christ Episcopal Church in Rochdale, Massachusetts, to a larger network of volunteers, the Worcester Telegram & Gazette reported.“With people staying separate, nobody knows how to love, and this was a true act of love,” said the Rev. Aileen DiBenedetto, the church’s rector.Diocese of Central New York will hold renewal of vows for all clergy and laityAs COVID-19 limits many church ministries but presents opportunities for new ones, Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe invites all the clergy and lay people of the Diocese of Central New York to renew their baptismal and ordination vows together via Zoom. The virtual ceremony will take place from noon to 1 p.m. on March 31 and can be accessed as a videoconference or an audio call from any phone.Episcopal Church seeks singers and musicians to perform Easter hymn as a ‘virtual choir’The Episcopal Church is asking musically inclined people from across the church to help create a virtual choir: a group of people (sometimes dozens, hundreds or even thousands) performing the same piece of music, recording their parts remotely from wherever they are. A team of video and audio engineers will then edit the submissions and synchronize them. The result will be released on Easter Sunday, and a classic Easter hymn has been chosen: “The Strife is O’er.”“If you’re a choir member without a choir, a musician without an orchestra, or just someone who loves to sing and be part of the group, you’re who we need!” the church wrote.Singers and musicians can download the sheet music and an audio file of their parts, find instructions on how to record them, and then upload them here by the end of the day on March 27.– Egan MillardWednesday, March 25Presiding bishop joins worldwide prayer offering via Facebook LivePresiding Bishop Michael Curry joined Pope Francis and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby in calling for all Christians to pray for healing amid the COVID-19 pandemic at noon on March 25. Curry offered the prayer “In Time of Great Sickness and Mortality” from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer, followed by the Lord’s Prayer. Thursday, April 16Episcopal-rooted women’s society makes masks for farmworkersThe Society of the Companions of the Holy Cross, an ecumenical group of more than 800 Christian women, is calling on its members to make face masks to donate and help prevent the spread of COVID-19 among farmworkers.The society, founded by Episcopal women in 1884, sent a message to its membership this week on behalf of two chapters that are rallying support for about 25,000 residents and farmworkers in Immokalee, Florida, an inland community southeast of Fort Myers.“They are in severe danger of contacting the coronavirus. They have no protection or medical facilities,” the message said, according to Ann Smith, a society member and former head of The Episcopal Church’s women’s ministry office.The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended Americans cover their noses and mouths with face coverings in situations where social distancing is difficult, to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The threat of transmission is of particular concern among farming communities, where impoverished workers often live close together in group quarters and with little defense against the virus, according to an op-ed by Greg Asbed, a founder of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.“The two most promising measures for protecting ourselves from the virus and preventing its spread — social distancing and self-isolation — are effectively impossible in farmworker communities,” Asbed said April 3 in The New York Times.Young Episcopalians ‘take over’ diocese’s Facebook page to lead worshipThe Diocese of Pennsylvania is offering daily worship services on its Facebook page — which at first wouldn’t seem unusual in this time when churches have shifted online because in-person worship is suspended.The difference this week is that Pennsylvania has allowed young people of the diocese to “take over” the page and lead Morning Prayer, Noonday Prayer, Evening Prayer and Compline.That means followers of the diocese Facebook page were able to pray Morning Prayer with Kellina, from Grace Episcopal Church and the Incarnation in Philadelphia, Noonday Prayer with Kojo, from St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Yeadon, and Compline with Diahna, from St. Andrew and St. Monica Episcopal Church in Philadelphia.Kojo even played a song during his video, “My God Is Awesome.” Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Brooklyn church’s art installation honors front-line workersIn the distant and not-so-distant past, church steeples have been used to mark momentous occasions and send messages by ringing their bells. A New York City church is carrying on that tradition in a different way, using LED lights instead of bells. The steeple of the Brooklyn church that houses Iglesia de la Santa Cruz and Bushwick Abbey (both congregations of the Diocese of Long Island) has been transformed into an art installation by Jonathan Sparks called “Lights Over Bushwick.”The mid-century modern steeple has an unusual checkerboard pattern of metal squares and open squares, in which Sparks installed LED panels that can glow in different colors and alternating patterns, controlled by a smartphone app. They have been set to glow blue and cycle through an animation sequence every day at 7 p.m. as part of the #lightitblue campaign, a tribute to essential workers. Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET 2:44 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tuesday, April 14Watch The Episcopal Church’s virtual choir perform an Easter hymnBack in March, The Episcopal Church asked singers and musicians from across the church to help create a virtual choir: a group of people (sometimes dozens, hundreds or even thousands) performing the same piece of music, recording their parts remotely from wherever they are. Vocal and instrumental parts for the chosen hymn — the Easter classic “The Strife is O’er” — were posted online, participants filmed themselves performing and a group of editors and engineers put it all together in one seamless arrangement.The final product, comprised of nearly 800 submissions from over 600 people around the world, premiered on Easter Sunday: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA After coronavirus recovery, rector greets congregation by video on EasterEaster Sunday marked five weeks since the Rev. Timothy Cole, rector of Christ Church Georgetown in Washington, D.C., informed his congregation on March 8 that he had tested positive for COVID-19. It was the first confirmed coronavirus case in the nation’s capital.With the city now approaching 2,000 cases, including 50 deaths, Cole spoke for about five minutes April 12 at the beginning of the congregation’s online Easter service, thanking parishioners for their prayers and support.The Rev. Timothy Cole, rector of Christ Church Georgetown. Photo: Christ Church, via YouTubeCole said that while he was being treated at a hospital, he “spent three weeks in a white room with one window showing nothing that is alive outside it.”“It’s been a long road for me,” he said, standing outside in front of the church. “I think I was as a bit sicker that I thought I was, but I am therefore that much more grateful for being home here with my family and here with you this morning, albeit in this virtual sense.”Christ Church Georgetown, just east of the Georgetown University campus, is one of the largest congregations in The Episcopal Church, with an average Sunday attendance of just under 450. Late March 8, the hundreds of parishioners who had visited or attended services at the church on Feb. 24 or between Feb. 28 and March 3 were urged by city health officials to quarantine themselves for 14 days due to possible exposure there to the coronavirus. The church’s organist, Tom Smith, also became sick with the disease.Cole was one of at least eight people to have tested positive for the coronavirus after attending the mid-February conference of the CEEP Network in Louisville, Kentucky.In his introduction to Christ Church’s Easter service, Cole said this is a time of “great fear” as COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, threatens people’s lives and livelihoods. It is easier to face that fear knowing that God will see us through, he said, and it is hard to be afraid when supported by loving friends and family. He also praised his congregation for finding ways, often online, to continue the work of the church while maintaining social distancing precautions.“We are going to come out of this a stronger community than we went into it. And we were a strong community to already,” he said. “My prayer for all our churches and all our communities across this country and for the country itself is that that will be true for those communities and this country, too, that we will come out of this stronger than we went in.”— David Paulsen Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Thursday, April 9Southern Virginia churches toll bells in gratitudeThe Diocese of Southern Virginia is inviting its congregations to ring their bells as a sign of gratitude to the health care workers and first responders who are working tirelessly to treat COVID-19 patients. Churches are encouraged to ring their bells for three minutes at noon every Thursday until the crisis subsides, if they can do so while still observing the state’s restrictions.“Our churches have rung bells in time of sorrow and in times of joy − now we can ring them to let health care workers and first responders know that we are praying for them and appreciate their efforts to care for our communities,” the diocese wrote.Prayers and expressions of thanks can also be shared on social media using the hashtag #SoVaGrateful so that “first responders will be uplifted by our posts and find comfort in knowing that their service and commitment is valued.”Bishops United warns of gun violence risks during pandemicBishops United Against Gun Violence, a network of more than 100 Episcopal bishops, shared an opinion article with Religion News Service this week that argues the COVID-19 pandemic has only increased the need to respond to the United States’ ongoing struggle with gun violence and gun safety.“In the midst of one plague, we are sowing the seeds of another,” the bishops say, pointing to a sudden increase in gun sales in the past month, possibly driven by fear of a breakdown in social order.“As bishops of The Episcopal Church, we are concerned that the proliferation of weapons in our society will result not in greater safety, but in greater violence,” they say. Suicide is of particular concern, at a time when Americans are advised to spend most of their time isolated in their homes to slow the spread of the coronavirus.“Just as you take care to protect yourself against infection in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, so we urge you to protect yourself and your loved ones from circumstances in which gun violence is likely to occur.”You can read the full article here.– David PaulsenDiocese of Atlanta campus missioner traveling to New York to help hospitals as nurseThe Diocese of Atlanta on April 8 shared a first-person story of a campus missioner who is trained as a registered nurse and chose to travel to New York to assist with the coronavirus response in the epicenter of the virus’s spread in the United States.Rebecca Land Segrest is a missioner assigned to the Northwest Georgia Canterbury Club, which includes Berry College, Shorter College and Georgia Highlands. She is preparing to leave April 12 to spend eight weeks helping at overcrowded hospitals in New York.“I don’t really know what to expect when I get there, but I am sure I will quickly find out,” Segrest says in a post on the diocese’s website. “I have been in numerous situations where you don’t know what you’re getting into when you respond, but you go, because someone needs your help, praying that your training is enough.”New York State has recorded about 150,000 cases of the coronavirus as of April 9, including more than 80,000 in New York City, according to data compiled by The New York Times. More than 6,000 people have died in the state.Missouri priest provides medical expertise from her background as doctorAdd the Rev. Maria Evans to the short list of Episcopal clergy who are sharing their medical expertise with dioceses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Evans, serving as interim rector of Christ Church in Rolla, Missouri, also is a pathologist and laboratory medical director who has more than 30 years of experience advising hospitals on infection control.Evans has begun answering questions on the Diocese of Missouri’s website in a feature called “Ask the Rev. Doctor Maria.” In an April 7 post, she responds to questions about COVID-19 immunity and availability of testing.You can read her answers here.The Diocese of Maine also has a priest who also serves as a doctor. The Rev. Suzanne Roberts, an associate at St. Luke’s Cathedral in Portland, discussed the virus March 21 in a video the diocese posted to YouTube.– David PaulsenMonday, April 6Virtual choir sings ‘Ride on, King Jesus’ during Switzerland church’s Palm Sunday serviceAs more and more churches move their Sunday services online, virtual choirs are popping up as well. During its April 5 Palm Sunday livestream service, Emmanuel Episcopal Church’s virtual choir performed “Ride on, King Jesus.” Fast forward to 17:30 to watch and listen.Emmanuel is an Episcopal church in Geneva, Switzerland, and part of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe.Friday, April 3Presiding Bishop shares message of hope on NBC’s ‘Today’Presiding Bishop Michael Curry made another network news appearance on April 3, this time on NBC’s “Today” show. Curry and Rabbi Shai Held, president of the Hadar Institute, joined hosts Hoda Kotb and Savannah Guthrie to talk about how to keep hope alive in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis.“We can navigate through difficult and tough times by holding onto God’s hand and holding onto each other’s hands − at a respectful social distance,” Curry said. Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Presiding Bishop’s Easter reflection featured in Washington PostPresiding Bishop Michael Curry was one of nine religious leaders — including the Rev. Timothy Cole (see above) whose thoughts on celebrating Easter amid the COVID-19 pandemic were featured in The Washington Post’s opinion section on April 10.Curry noted that while this year, Easter may not look and feel like Easter — the celebratory feast we’ve come to know and love — neither did the first Easter, which was marked by confusion and disappointment.“You can’t change the fact of death,” Curry wrote. “But you can love through it.”Florida priest appears in city PSAThe Rev. Adrienne Hymes, missioner for church extension for the Diocese of Southwest Florida, lent her voice to a PSA from the city of Tampa featuring religious leaders encouraging citizens to worship from home. The city’s #HappyAtHomeTPA campaign aims to keep people connected during the implementation of physical distancing.“Our faith is bigger than this virus,” Hymes said, with an altar and Episcopal flag in the background. “We are all in this together.” Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Thursday, April 2Massachusetts priests entertain parishioners with dance challengeMaybe you’ve seen some of the dance challenges that are spreading on social media as people find ways to entertain themselves under lockdown. But have you seen a priest do it in a cassock?That’s what the Rev. Tim Schenck, rector of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Massachusetts, did. The Rev. Jack Clark, the associate rector at St. John’s, filmed herself dancing along to Meghan Trainor’s “Me Too” and challenged the parish’s families to do the same. If 10 families did it, Schenck would follow suit.In just a few days, they did. The result even made the local news. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [Episcopal News Service] In addition to its continuing news coverage of major developments in The Episcopal Church’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to contain the virus, Episcopal News Service is compiling various updates from congregations and ministries across the church. If you have a news item, email it to [email protected] Updates will be added to the top of this page. Full ENS coverage of the church’s response to the new coronavirus can be found here.Tuesday, May 26New York Times highlights Episcopal hospital’s COVID-19 responseSt. John’s Episcopal Hospital in the Far Rockaway neighborhood of Queens in New York City is the subject of a New York Times documentary feature titled “‘Lord Have Mercy’: Inside One of New York’s Deadliest ZIP Codes.” St. John’s is one of the last remaining hospitals in the United States that is overseen by an Episcopal diocese (the Diocese of Long Island), and has been at the epicenter of New York’s COVID-19 outbreak, with the first recorded case of the virus in Queens. Within a month, it had successfully treated and discharged over 120 COVID-19 patients, although many others didn’t make it. Wednesday, April 29Applying the Way of Love to a pandemic-ravaged worldThe Episcopal Church has released companion materials along with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s April 29 Word to the Church, highlighting how the Way of Love can provide guidance during the COVID-19 pandemic.The new materials include a look at the Way of Love through the lens of COVID-19 and a selection of prayers for the various circumstances Episcopalians may find themselves in during this time.“In moments like this, we need God more than ever,” said the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care. “And in the Way of Love, we have a clear pathway for growing our relationship with God and each other.”Thursday, April 23Michigan church hosts webinar with lieutenant governor, state representative and bishopWhat will our communities look like in the aftermath of the pandemic and how can churches prepare for that? Those were some of the questions addressed in a webinar hosted by Christ Church Cranbrook in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, on April 22. In addition to the Rev. William Danaher Jr., the church’s rector, the discussion group included Michigan Lt. Gov. Garlin Gilchrist, State Rep. Mari Manoogian, Bishop Bonnie Perry of the Diocese of Michigan, and the Rev. Charles Christian Adams, pastor of Hartford Memorial Baptist Church in Detroit.The discussion also touched on on how churches and governments can respond to the racial disparities that have emerged in the pandemic; data collected so far indicates that African Americans are being disproportionately affected by the virus.“I am extraordinarily grateful to Rep. Manoogian and Lt. Gov. Gilchrist for participating in this important webinar,” Danaher said in a press release. “I am also grateful that Rev. Adams and Bishop Perry can join us so we can explore the ways that religious and governmental leaders can work together to respond to the COVID-19 virus not only here in Metro Detroit, but throughout our nation.” Friday, April 17Priest’s viral rap video reminds Rhode Islanders to practice physical distancingHow do you keep your congregation connected, entertained and informed during the COVID-19 pandemic? The Rev. Meaghan Brower has an unconventional answer: quarantine-themed song parodies.Brower, the executive director of the Episcopal Conference Center and priest at the adjoining Church of the Beloved in Pascoag, Rhode Island, has been trying to connect with her congregants every day. But, she told the Providence Journal, “there are only so many spiritually profound things you can say day after day.” So she’s been making parodies that are “kind of focused around following CDC guidelines” on physical distancing.Her fourth in the series, a parody of Young MC’s “Bust a Move,” has taken off on social media. Brower made the 1989 rap hit into a tribute to Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo, whom Brower considers “the ultimate Rhode Island mom when it comes to telling people what we need to do to stay safe,” and a reminder to follow her directions. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Wednesday, April 1The Rev. Janet Broderick shares her near-death COVID-19 experienceThe Rev. Janet Broderick, the rector of All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Beverly Hills, California, shared her near-death COVID-19 experience with New York Magazine on March 31.“I was close to death. I kind of had gone off the cliff — my lungs had to make a decision. I had pneumonia and water in my lungs. I remember thinking, Calm down and go to sleep. I spoke to Jesus, I planned my funeral. I FaceTimed with my children. They say how I looked and sounded like Darth Vader. I was gasping for air,” she said of her first night in ICU.Broderick was one of at least six people who attended the mid-February CEEP Network conference in Kentucky to contract the new coronavirus. She formerly served as rector of historic Grace Church Van Vorst in Jersey City, New Jersey. She is the sister of actor Matthew Broderick.Monday, March 30Washington Post profiles rector who had D.C.’s first COVID-19 caseThe Rev. Timothy ColeThe Rev. Timothy Cole, the rector of a Washington, D.C., church who had the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the city, is the subject of an in-depth Washington Post article that tells the story of his infection, hospitalization and recovery.Cole, 59, is the rector of Christ Church Georgetown, one of the largest parishes in The Episcopal Church. The parish’s organist, Thomas Smith, and four parishioners also tested positive.“However hard the cost may be, we know there will come a point where we can see the end, and we know there will come a point we will be at the end and be able to start again,” Cole told the Post.Sunday Sermon in a Pandemic: Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Jim Wallis in conversationIn this first episode of the Sunday Sermon in a Pandemic series, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and the Rev. Jim Wallis discuss making connections to faith and worship, spirituality and justice, in the digital and social media age. Click here to listen.Presiding Bishop talks about keeping the faith on ABC NewsPresiding Bishop Michael Curry appeared on ABC News on March 27 to talk about how people of faith can maintain spiritual health in times of crisis. Curry’s conversation with host Amy Robach touched on the ways churches are moving communal worship online and ways that people can still help their communities while keeping their distance. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Friday, May 1Virginia church hosts pandemic-themed online art and poetry exhibitionSt. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Arlington, Virginia, invited recruited dozens of artists and poets to create new works on the theme of pandemic for an online exhibition on the church’s website. Participants were given selections from a list of 17 words, such as “beauty,” “lockdown,” “renewal,” “spirit” and “touch,” and asked to create artworks or poems using the words as inspiration.“This online exhibition is intended to get us thinking about and discussing the stories we tell through our visual art and poetry, not only the paradoxes and ambiguities of our lives at this moment but also what ways and how we might reshape our futures,” the church said in an online introduction to the exhibition.You can access the works collected in the exhibition here.Thursday, April 30Got the pandemic blues? Bishop’s humorous videos are must-see reliefLet us state for the record that the COVID-19 pandemic is a serious global health crisis, the likes of which few of us have ever seen. With more than 3 million cases confirmed worldwide, at least 200,000 have died.At the same time, some laughter now and then might make it a bit easier for all of us to live through this crisis and the disruptions to normal life it has caused. For that, Western North Carolina Bishop José McLoughlin is up to the task.Introducing “Quarantine with Bishop José.”Episode three of the video series landed on the diocese’s YouTube page on April 26, and it has been viewed more than 3,000 times in its first week. McLoughlin stars alone in the video — because social distancing. Throughout the three-minute video, he shows off his sense of humor in scenes that range from unsurprisingly affirmative conversations with the bobbleheads on his desk to a show-stopping Billy Idol dance number. (You just have to see it to believe it.) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tuesday, March 24Maine doctor who also serves as priest answers coronavirus questionsThe Diocese of Maine is drawing on the expertise of a priest as it informs Episcopalians about COVID-19. But the Rev. Suzanne Roberts, an associate at St. Luke’s Cathedral in Portland, isn’t just any priest. She’s also a primary care physician.“I’m speaking to you from both of my roles,” Roberts said in a video the diocese posted to YouTube on March 21 to answer questions about the coronavirus pandemic. In the video, she wears her white clergy collar, and “you’ll have to imagine the white coat, because I tend to not wear them at the same time,” she says. Rector Shreveport, LA Monday, March 23‘Habits of Grace’: An invitation for you, from Presiding Bishop Curry Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME As Episcopalians adjust their everyday lives to slow the spread of the new coronavirus by practicing social distancing, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has invited them to join him on Mondays through May in taking a moment to cultivate a “habit of grace.”Friday, March 20‘Drive-in’ church in McAllen, TexasSt. John’s Episcopal Church in McAllen, Texas, is planning a “drive-in church” service at 10:30 a.m. Sundays starting on March 22.The idea is similar to a drive-in movie, with congregants parking their cars in the church’s lot and tuning their radios to the frequency – 97.3 FM – on which the Morning Prayer service will be broadcast. This “new way of worshiping together” is set for at least the next three Sundays.“We invite you to sing, pray and participate together with us from the comfort and safety of your own automobiles,” the congregation said in a Facebook announcement.Other churches are considering or moving forward with similar worship arrangements, including the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which offered drive-through Communion on March 15.– David PaulsenCross-denomination food ministry carries on in Albertville, AlabamaChrist Episcopal Church in Albertville, Alabama, participated in a cross-denominational food ministry on March 18, meeting at First Baptist Church to load cars with bagged food and then distribute the food to families around town.“What a blessing it was to be able to help our fellow Albertians during this time of need and risk,” the Rev. Omar Reyes told Episcopal News Service in an email.– David PaulsenTexas rector recovers from virusThe Rev. Robert Pace, one of the first Episcopal rectors to test positive for COVID-19, has been released from quarantine after two negative tests confirmed he has cleared the virus, though he is still recovering from the pneumonia it caused.The Rev. Robert Pace.Pace, the 53-year-old rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Fort Worth, Texas, was hospitalized with the first documented case of the virus in his county on March 9. He was released from the hospital on March 17 and is at home with his wife, who has not tested positive but is still in quarantine, the Diocese of Fort Worth said. Pace was one of at least six people who attended the CEEP conference in February who have tested positive for COVID-19.“I am significantly improved in my health, but I am still weak,” Pace said in the diocesan statement. “One of the difficult things about this coronavirus is the pneumonia and the shortness of breath. Although I am much better, it’s still a process. … We are called to be the church in new ways. We love as God loves in this particular day and age by keeping this virus from spreading. We minimize our physical contact with others. But that doesn’t mean we limit the ways we reach out to each other.”– Egan MillardWedding bells ring in Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaChurches everywhere are taking precautions in how they handle weddings and funerals, including in many cases postponing them if possible unless they can be limited to small groups.Allia Dhody and her fiancé, Michael Mountjoy, decided they couldn’t wait to marry, so on March 18 they spent the afternoon with the Rev. Jarrett Kerbel, rector of the Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for a pandemic-style wedding in the garden in front of the church.“Married these two on the sunny terrace during a pandemic,” Kerbel said in a Facebook post. “Their nephew below had a plague stick to keep us all six feet apart (except for the bride and groom) and a plague mask. His mother works at the Mudder Museum, so…..”The only others in attendance: Dhody’s mother, sister and brother-in-law, according to a Philadelphia Inquirer report. Mountjoy’s parents “attended” via Facetime. There was no reception.“We did it because we have a marriage license that is going to expire and the courts are closed and we didn’t know what to do,” Dhody told the Inquirer. “So much has changed so quickly from when we got the license.”– David PaulsenCARAVAN launches an open call for artwork on mending the brokenness of our global familyRecognizing the interconnectedness of today’s world, the many ailments besieging humanity — injustice, exploitation, conflict, abuse — and in response to spread and impact of the coronavirus worldwide, CARAVAN is making an open call to artists around the world to submit two- and three-dimensional works for an online expedition.The deadline for submissions is May 16. Click here for more information. Can’t touch this – it’s Holy Eucharist at St. James’And a final update for Friday: File this under, “Clergy With a Sense of Humor.”St. James’ Episcopal Church in Jackson, Mississippi, is practicing social distancing quite literally in this spoof video. It hits us so hard, makes us say, “Oh, my lord!” Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Friday, May 15Georgia priest donates plasma to help others after recovering from COVID-19Contracting the coronavirus has allowed the Rev. Erwin Veale to help other COVID-19 patients like him. After recovering from his infection, Veale, a hospital chaplain in Augusta, Georgia, volunteered to donate plasma to be used in treatments.“If there’s something I can do that might help, I wanted to do that,” Veale told the Augusta Chronicle, which caught up to him May 13 while he was donating plasma at Shepheard Community Blood Center.In addition to his chaplain work at University Hospital, Veale also serves as a priest associate at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, according to the Diocese of Georgia.Wednesday, May 13Grace Cathedral will host memorial evensong for recently deceasedGrace Cathedral. Photo: Wikipedia CommonsGrace Cathedral in San Francisco, California, will hold a livestream memorial evensong service on May 17 for all those who have died since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The service will take place on Facebook Live at 4 p.m. Pacific time.“While the pandemic limits our ability to hold funerals, this service will a hold a space for grief and loss, as well as Christian hope of new life,” the cathedral wrote.Tuesday, May 12Priest envisions Gospel of John if Jesus’ words were ‘live and over the internet’ Getting sick of using Zoom for most of your face-to-face human interaction? Jesus agrees with you. At least that’s the opinion of the Jesus in the Gospel of John as updated for the coronavirus pandemic by the Rev. Julie Hoplamazian, associate rector at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Manhattan, New York.“I was banging my head against the wall trying to come up with a positive, inspiring message for the congregation,” Hoplamazian told ENS. When the lectionary offered her “dwelling places,” she began to think “Zoom rooms.” What resulted was a short video that served not only an effective piece of clerical procrastination but also a humorous etiquette lesson for gathering online.“I wrote it all in one sitting. Maybe quarantine is getting to me,” she said. Wednesday, April 15New Hampshire bishop offers serious message with ‘foolish’ unicycle rideThe COVID-19 pandemic has made many ordinary activities impossible, but if you wanted to see a bishop ride a unicycle, this was your day.The disease was no barrier. In fact it was the reason New Hampshire Bishop Rob Hirschfeld hopped on one wheel wearing his mitre, along with a cloth face mask and plastic gloves, and pedaled the streets of Concord and the walkways outside the State House for four minutes. His serious message: It’s OK to look “foolish” when taking proper health precautions in public.“Wear the mask,” Hirschfeld said in a video posted to Facebook. “You don’t have to wear that hat.”The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended Americans cover their noses and mouths with face coverings when going outside for essential errands, to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. (The CDC did not issue any recommendation about bishops’ hats.)“We’re hearing some people being very self-conscious about wearing masks, and they shouldn’t be,” Hirschfeld said. He also promoted his unicycle ride as a fundraiser, with followers encouraged to donate to the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation’s Community Crisis Action Fund, which is responding to the pandemic.Hirschfeld also invoked a biblical reference to “foolishness,” in 1 Corinthians 1:18, when he announced the ride: “For the word of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.” Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Monday, May 11Convocation hosts webinar with former English health officialThe Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe will hold an informational event on COVID-19 with a European focus called “COVID, Community and a Changed Church: A Conversation with the Rev. Professor Gina Radford.”Radford is the former deputy chief medical officer for England. She led the U.K.’s efforts to deal with Ebola and helped establish the U.K.’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. She stepped down from this position in 2019, having been ordained a priest in 2016. She now serves two small parishes in the Diocese of Exeter.The convocation will host a Zoom-based forum with her on May 13 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time. It will go for an hour. Bishop Mark Edington will ask her about— her path in bivocational ministry— her views on how churches should approach reopening, and what best practices would look like— her sense of what this moment will mean for the future of God’s call to the church in missionWednesday, May 6Episcopalians are invited to attend a national interfaith online prayer serviceThe interfaith alliance Religions For Peace USA, of which The Episcopal Church is a member, is holding a National Interfaith Prayer Service for Healing and Hope via Zoom and Facebook Live on May 7, and all are invited to participate.The service will include prayers for all those affected by COVID-19 and readings of sacred texts, including one from Rushad Thomas of The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations. It will start at 2 p.m. Eastern time.Monday, May 4National Cathedral organist celebrates Star Wars Day with special performanceOver the past decade, May 4 has become an unofficial holiday celebrating all things “Star Wars” (as in “May the Fourth be with you”). Washington National Cathedral already has a connection to the “Star Wars” series in the form of a Darth Vader gargoyle, but this year, one of its organists celebrated Star Wars Day with a performance of a theme from the original 1977 movie.George Fergus, assistant organist and associate director of music, played John Williams’ “Throne Room” theme (arranged by Jason Sherlock) on the cathedral’s 10,000-pipe organ as part of its online music program.“Even to this day, when I watch a ‘Star Wars’ movie, I’m bowled over by the music of John Williams that accompanies these epic, vast space sequences,” Fergus said.last_img read more

Sewanee issues statement rejecting past ties to Confederacy, commits to…

first_imgSewanee issues statement rejecting past ties to Confederacy, commits to further racial justice initiatives By Egan MillardPosted Sep 8, 2020 Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Theological Education Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Racial Justice & Reconciliation, Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY The campus of Sewanee: The University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. Courtesy photo[Episcopal News Service] The University of the South, the Episcopal college and School of Theology in Sewanee, Tennessee, stepped up its racial justice and reconciliation efforts on Sept. 8 with the release of statements denouncing its past association with the Confederacy and committing “to an urgent process of institutional reckoning.”“The University of the South categorically rejects its past veneration of the Confederacy and of the ‘Lost Cause,’” the university’s Board of Regents wrote, pledging to “make Sewanee a model of diversity, of inclusion, of intellectual rigor and of loving spirit in an America that rejects prejudice and embraces possibility.”Vice Chancellor and President Reuben Brigety II also announced a new round of initiatives intended “to lead in embracing equality and inclusion.” These include recruiting more students and faculty from underrepresented communities; continuing its research-based truth and reconciliation program; ensuring that “the full history of the South” is presented; and creating a commission that will evaluate memorials, buildings and place names on campus.Reuben Brigety II, vice chancellor and president of Sewanee: The University of the South, speaks at the university on Feb. 28, 2020. Courtesy photoBrigety wrote that this is the first time Sewanee leadership has “so clearly and powerfully” repudiated the racism that has haunted much of the university’s history. “By facing up to our past, we embrace the promise once and for all of moving beyond it.”Sewanee’s connection with white supremacy dates back to its founding in 1857 by southern dioceses of The Episcopal Church that wanted to establish a “slavers’ university, to represent the interests of a slaveholding society,” according to Sewanee history professor Woody Register.For nearly four years, Register has served as the director of Sewanee’s Roberson Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation. While the six-year research project is ongoing, the students and faculty working on it have delivered a preliminary research summary to the university leadership.Among its findings are that Sewanee “was the only institution of higher education designed from the start to represent, protect and promote the South’s civilization of bondage; and launched expressly for the slaveholding society of the South.”The summary also describes early Sewanee as “a child of the Confederacy,” with key leadership roles typically filled by men who had been slave owners, defenders of slavery and Confederate military leaders. The university also received key financial backing from donors whose fortunes derived from some of the South’s largest slavery-based plantations.“There remain many buildings and monuments on Sewanee’s campus that memorialize slaveholders or supporters of the Confederacy, articulators of scientific and other theories of white supremacy, and defenders of Jim Crow segregation,” the Roberson Project said.Sewanee workshop guides priests grappling with Confederate symbols in their parishesSewanee also refused to admit African Americans for nearly a century, and the university’s administration only allowed the School of Theology to accept its first Black student in 1953 after all but one of the theology faculty members resigned in protest of the university’s racially exclusionary policies.In recent years, Sewanee – which is still owned by 28 Episcopal dioceses – has sought to reckon with its white supremacist past through research and by moving or removing Confederate memorials on campus. The new statement builds on those efforts with a more forceful renunciation of that part of Sewanee’s past.“At its worst, the university has been associated with the most repugnant aspects of our national and regional history,” the regents wrote. “We are not flinching from that hard truth, for the truth, as we were assured long ago, can make us free—free from the prejudices and the passions of the past.”– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

Helpful tips for Hurricane cleanup now and in the future

first_img Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your comment! TAGSFEMAHurricane MatthewState Emergency Response Team Previous articleMercury fillings could be hurting youNext articleHow to Save Money on Halloween Decor, Food, and More Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Before returning to your home, make sure you have the following items among your clean-up and salvage supplies: government-issued photo ID (driver’s license, etc.) and proof of address; bottled water and non-perishable foods; first aid kit; cleanser or hand cleaning gel; hygiene products and toilet paper; insect repellent and sunscreen; flashlights and extra batteries; camera or cell phone to document damage; a list of important phone numbers; and plenty of cash (ATMs may not work).It’s also smart to create a back-up communication plan with family and friends in case you’re unable to call from your home or other areas affected by the hurricane.If you haven’t done so already, report your damage from the hurricane to your insurance company and local emergency manager.For more information on Florida’s disaster recovery visit fema.gov/disaster/4280, twitter.com/FEMA, facebook.com/FEMA, and fema.gov/blog. For imagery, video, graphics and releases, see www.fema.gov/hurricane-Matthew. Tips for Cleaning Your Home after Hurricane Matthew Florida residents returning to or repairing homes damaged by Hurricane Matthew should keep in mind that safety should always be their first consideration when inspecting and cleaning up buildings damaged by flood waters.Below are a few simple guidelines to follow that will make the clean-up and salvage process safer and easier:Always wear protective clothing including long-sleeved shirts, long pants, rubber or plastic gloves and waterproof boots or shoes.Before entering your home, look outside for damaged power lines, gas lines and other exterior damage.Take photos of your damage before you begin clean up and save repair receipts.Your home may be contaminated with mold, which raises the health risk for those with asthma, allergies and breathing conditions. Refer to the Center for Disease Control for more info on mold.Open doors and windows so your house can air out before spending any length of time inside.Turn off main electrical power and water systems and don’t use gas appliances until a professional can ensure they are safe.Check all ceilings and floors for signs of sagging or other potentially dangerous structural damage.Throw out all foods, beverages and medicines exposed to flood waters or mud including canned goods and containers with food or liquid.Also, throw out any items that absorb water and cannot be cleaned or disinfected (mattresses, carpeting, stuffed animals, etc.).Beware of snakes, insects, alligators and other animals that may be on your property or in your home.Remove all drywall and insulation that has been in contact with flood waters.Clean all hard surfaces (flooring, countertops, appliances, sinks, etc.) thoroughly with hot water and soap or detergent.center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

FEMA launches online directory for help with hurricane recovery

first_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 From the Federal Emergency Management AgencyOn September 23rd, FEMA designed a quick resource directory for disaster survivors with links and phone numbers for services throughout the state of Florida. To find help with food, housing, shelter, and other necessities, users now have access through their smart phones and on the web.WHAT: The resource directory has four links for the needs of Hurricane Irma survivors in Florida:  Immediate Needs Resources  Recovery Resources  Returning Home Resources  Financial Legal and Volunteer ResourcesWHEN: September 23, 2017WHERE: go here for more details.FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards. Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362). For TTY call 800-462-7585. FEMA’s temporary housing assistance and grants for public transportation expenses, medical and dental expenses, and funeral and burial expenses do not require individuals to apply for an SBA loan. However, applicants who receive SBA loan applications must submit them to SBA to be eligible for assistance that covers personal property, vehicle repair or replacement, and moving and storage expenses TAGSFEMA Previous articleIs the Amazon HQ2 coming to Central Florida?Next articleApopka Police Department Arrest Report Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 last_img read more